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Archive for the ‘Atari family’ Category

Atari 800XL fix for Expansion Ram 320XL

November 14th, 2010 No comments

I had to make this change to get the Expansion Ram 320XL running on my Atari 800XL:

source: atariage.com

Unboxing expansion Ram 320XL (320kB) for Atari 600/800XL

November 14th, 2010 No comments
Expansion Ram 320XL (320kB)

Autopsy:

The Expansion Ram 320XL is a external plug and play 320kB memory expansion card for Atari 600XL and 800XL machines designed by ctirad a user of AtariAge Forum.

Additionally there is a possibility to disable internal memory and remap it onto card (switchable via jumper), thus one can “fix” many failing XLs without even looking inside. Also, an unexpanded 16kB 600XLs can be upgraded to 320XL without any additional work.

The Expansion Ram 320XL uses banking via bits 2,3,5,6 and 4 of PORTB. As you can see this is compatible with “Atari magazine” expansion rather than a most common RAMBO or Compy shop setup, however I have to say the comaptibility with both old and new software is excellent. There can be only problem with some programs, which does use the separate Antic/CPU banking.

The Installation is very easy. The Atari 600XL users will just plug it into PBI port. For Atari 800XL is a bit more complicated, because Atari decided to remove 5V power from the PBI connector from it. Thus 800XL users will have either to use additional power cable which will fit into joystick port or solder one wire inside atari to make the PBI port powered like on 600XL (look photo).

For more information and price visit the atariage.com.

source: atariage.com

Atari Portfolio

November 5th, 2010 No comments
Atari Portfolio

Autopsy:

from Wikipedia:

The Atari Portfolio is the first PC-compatible palmtop computer, and was released by Atari Corporation in 1989. The Portfolio was licenced from Distributed Information Processing (DIP) based in Guildford, Surrey, England. The original founding member of DIP was Ian Cullimore, fresh from his experiences at helping design the early Organiser products at Psion.

DIP officially stood for “Distributed Information Processing”, although secretly it actually stood for “David, Ian and Peter”, the three founding members of the company, all ex-Psion. The original founder of the company (first called “Crushproof Software”) was Ian Cullimore, and the other two David Frodsham and Peter Baldwin. It was built around an Intel 80C88 CPU running at 4.9152 MHz and ran a variant of MS-DOS called “DIP DOS 2.11″. It had 128 kB of RAM and 256 kB of ROM which contained the OS and built-in applications. The on-board RAM had to be divided between system memory and local storage (the C: drive). The LCD was monochrome without backlight and had 240×64 pixels or 40 characters x 8 lines.

source: wikipedia

SIO Tape Cable for Commodore

November 5th, 2010 No comments

This is a rare SIO Adapter cable. You can use it for connect the Atari 1010 Program Recorder on Commodore 64/128.

AtariMax free replacement 8mbit cartridge

September 3rd, 2010 No comments
AtariMax cartridges (1MBit / 8MBit)

Autopsy:

I bought one month ago a AtariMax 8MBit Cartridge for Atari that had the wrong label on it, it is a 1mbit in place of a 8mbit.

This is a free replacement 8mbit cartridge from Steven J.Tucker (AtariMax). Many Thanks Steven.

source: atarimax.com

Unboxing Atarimax Multi-Cart for Atari 8-bit

August 3rd, 2010 1 comment
Atarimax Maxflash Multi-Cart for Atari 8-bit.

Autopsy:

The Atarimax Maxflash Flash Cartridge System for Atari 8-bit Computers is a high quality, professionally produced cartridge creation suite for the Atari 400/800/XL/XE series computers.

Maxflash Studio Demostration:

source: atarimax.com

Testing the SIO2SD interface for Atari

July 31st, 2010 No comments

Fixed the SIO2SD Firmware Crash.

The SIO2SD is a device that allows you to load games/applications into any 8-bit Atari XL/XE computers via SIO interface from SD/MMC cards.

Atari Disk Drive 1050 Boxed + Floppy Disk

July 12th, 2010 No comments
Atari Disk Drive 1050 Boxed

Autopsy:

from atarimuseum Homepage:

The Atari 1050 disk drive was Atari’s replacement to the Atari 810 disk drive. The new Atari 1050 disk drive matched the new high-tech, low profile line of Atari XL home computer systems. The original Atari 810 could hold single density data (88K out of 100K diskettes) which was standard.

The new Atari 1050 disk drives were DUAL-DENSITY disk drives and could use the older Atari 810 diskettes, but could also hold data in a new Enhanced Density mode of 127K. Although the standard for disk drives was 180K, this additional storage was welcomed by Atari users who bought the disk drives.

The only downside to the disk drives were their new version of Atari DOS: 3.0 which had compatibility problems with its earlier version: 2.0s Atari would later fix this problem with a very well designed and accepted and one of the most popular Atari versions of DOS:  2.5.

Up to 4 Atari disk drives could be “daisy-chained” together. Using Atari’s unique SIO bus (Serial I/O), each drive would connect to the next, forming a chain in which data was transferred. Although slower then other I/O buses used on other computers, Atari’s SIO bus was a simple and convenient way for the non-computer literate to more easily add components onto their Atari computer systems (other brands of computers required internal cards, ribbon cables, complicated jumper block settings which were geared more towards the computer hobbyist crowd instead of the common individual with little computer knowledge).

The disk drive electronics and its mechanism were done by Tandon, the case design was done by Tom Palecki, formerly of Atari’s Industrial Design group. Tom was also responsible for the design of the Atari 1055 3.5″ disk drive which was never released by Atari, Inc. due to its sales in 1984.

source: atarimuseum.com

Atari 1010 Program Recorder (Tape drive) Boxed

July 11th, 2010 No comments
Atari 1010 Program Recorder Boxed

Autopsy:

from atarimuseum Homepage:

The Atari 1010 Program Recorder was the replacement to the Atari 400/800 lines Atari 410 Program recorder. The new 1010 was stylish and simplistic to use. Although no faster then any other standard tape recorder/Program Recorder, the Atari 1010 was a reliable little unit and was very popular in European markets where money was tight and the majority of software was available on Tape Cassettes.

What made the Atari Data/Program recorders unique from all other cassette decks used on other home computers was its ability to tie into the Atari Audio Summation Circuitry. The Atari 410, 1010 and the Atari XC11 & XC12 Data/Program recorders all worked through the Atari SIO (Serial I/O) bus, a data communications bus very similar to today’s USB (Universal Serial Bus). The Data/Program recorders could all be controlled by the Atari computer and also channeled their audio into the SIO bus and into the Atari computer where it would be heard through a connected Television or Computer Monitor.

The Data/Program recorders also were Dual Track systems and could load data while also playing audio/music tracks simultaneously. This meant that while another section of a program was loading, the recorder could give the user instructions, information or play a soundtrack to occupy the users time while the program loaded. This system was used extensively in Atari’s unique and unparalleled line of educational software.

source: atarimuseum.com

Atari Pro Line Joystick Boxed

July 11th, 2010 1 comment
Atari Pro Line Joystick Boxed

Autopsy:

Standard 7800 joysticks, compatible with the 2600 and 8 Bit Computer series. Marketed as advanced controllers, featuring independently functioning buttons (7800 only). Long, narrow design.

source: atariage.com

Atari 130 XE (Keyboard Fixed)

July 11th, 2010 No comments

The functions keys (Start / Option / Select / Reset..) of my Atari 130 XE not making good contact, i have fixed this problem with a good clean-up and graphite of a pencil.

Atari 130 XE Boxed + Cartridges Games

July 11th, 2010 No comments
ATARI 130 XE

Autopsy:

from old-computers Homepage:

The Atari 130-XE was first shown at the Winter Las Vegas Consumer Electronic Show in 1985 (with the Atari 130 ST), it has the same characteristics as the Atari 800 XL except its added memory (128 KB instead of 64 KB for the 800 XL).

The extended memory can be used as a RAM disk, or can be accessed by bank switching routines. It was an attempt to extend the life of the old XL series, but Atari abandoned it pretty quickly to concentrate on promoting the ST series, which uses the same case style.

source: old-computers.com

Atari 800/130 Software cassette

July 6th, 2010 No comments

Today i picked up some software cassette for Atari 800/130.

Unboxing SIO2SD interface by Pigula

July 6th, 2010 1 comment
SIO2SD interface by Pigula

Autopsy:

Testing the SIO2SD interface for Atari

The SIO2SD  is a device that allows you to load games/applications into any 8-bit Atari XL/XE computers via SIO interface from SD/MMC cards.

Device abilities:

  • Works with SD (not SDHC) and MMC(FAT12,FAT16 and FAT32 formats)
  • Handles ATR (rw), XFD (ro) and COM/XEX (ro) file types.
  • 16×2 LCD display allows to “walk” catalog tree and choose files to load.
  • Handles SIO with turbo (allows to set speed index from 1 to 16, default is 6 (69kb/s), in versions 1.x speed index was always 10 (51kb/s))
  • All densities with 128B and 256B sectors, including 16MB disks.
  • Handles drives D1 to D8.
  • Can be configured using ATARI (it’s possible to load configuration tool directly from MCU flash memory, so no SD card is needed)

SIO2SD in Action:

source: sio2sd.gucio.pl marcinprusisz.pl

Atari 800 XL (Boxed)

June 23rd, 2010 4 comments
Atari 800 XL (Boxed)

Autopsy:

The Atari 800XL was the third version of the Atari 8-bit line of computers introduced in 1983. The system contained a full 64K of memory, had all the standard VLSI chips (Antic, GTIA, Pokey, PIA) and was in a smaller and more compact design. The keyboard was good, not as good as the 1200XL keyboard, but it had a solid feel to it.

The cartridge port had been move to the top center of the system and used special metal spring loaded doors to allow the insertion and removal of ROM cartridges. This system of spring loaded doors also kept dirt and objects from falling into the cartridge slot when it was not occupied.

Overall the system is basically a cost reduced Atari 800 with a fuzzier picture. The system came with built-in diagnostics and a HELP key. The OS was still slightly incompatible with many original Atari 400/800 software titles, but Atari began to distribute a “Translator” disk which would load up a 400/800 compatible OS into memory so that the 800XL could support those programs.

A never version of the 800XL was being readied called the 800XL-F which included the new “FREDDY” memory management chip that would have allowed for more use of free memory for programs and geater use of graphics by the “ANTIC” video processor.

from: atarimuseum.com