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Commodore VIC-20 (PET Style Keyboard)

December 12th, 2014 No comments

This is an old Commodore VIC-20 Home Computer (PAL) with a “Microgramma Extended Fonts” keyboard. The same keyboard is also used in the Commodore PET computer.

The “PET” style keyboard used on the VIC-1001 and early VIC-20s

The keyboards used in VIC-20 computers were manufactured for Commodore by Matsushita Corporation of Japan. Those used on the very first VIC-20s were almost completely flat-topped and identical in shape to that of Commodore’s PET computer (however, on the VIC-20 the PET’s number pad was replaced by four wide function keys).

The keyboards on later VIC-20s were manufactured with slightly concave tops. The concavity of the “F” and “J” keys was slightly more prominent to provide tactile feedback for touch-typists seeking the “home” position.

Commodore VIC-20 8-bit Home Computer

The VIC-20 (Germany: VC-20; Japan: VIC-1001) is an 8-bit home computer which was sold by Commodore Business Machines. The VIC-20 was announced in 1980, roughly three years after Commodore’s first personal computer, the PET. The VIC-20 was the first computer of any description to sell one million units.

The VIC-20 was intended to be more economical than the PET computer. It was equipped with only 5 kB of RAM (of this, only 3.5 KB were available to the BASIC programmer) and used the same MOS 6502 CPU as the PET. The VIC-20′s video chip, the MOS Technology VIC, was a general-purpose color video chip designed by Al Charpentier in 1977 and intended for use in inexpensive display terminals and game consoles, but Commodore could not find a market for the chip. As the Apple II gained momentum with the advent of VisiCalc in 1979, Jack Tramiel wanted a product that would compete in the same segment, to be presented at the January 1980 CES. For this reason Chuck Peddle and Bill Seiler started to design a computer named TOI (The Other Intellect).

Gallery:

source: sleepingelephant.com/denial/wiki wikipedia

Commodore VIC-20 ASSY 251040-01 Empty PCB

July 22nd, 2014 No comments
Commodore VIC-20 ASSY 251040-01 Empty PCB

Gallery:

Commodore VIC-20 ASSY 251040-01 Empty PCB.

Commodore VIC-20 found in the garbage

July 7th, 2014 No comments
Commodore VIC-20 found in the garbage

I have to thank my friend Andrea S. for having warned me that he had seen a Commodore VIC-20 near the trash loot.

Short gallery:

Commodore VIC-20 (USA/NTSC Version) Boxed

February 23rd, 2014 No comments
Commodore VIC-20 USA (Boxed)

Autopsy:

The VIC-20 (Germany: VC-20; Japan: VIC-1001) is an 8-bit home computer which was sold by Commodore Business Machines. The VIC-20 was announced in 1980, roughly three years after Commodore’s first personal computer, the PET. The VIC-20 was the first computer of any description to sell one million units.

The VIC-20 was intended to be more economical than the PET computer. It was equipped with only 5 kB of RAM (of this, only 3.5 KB were available to the BASIC programmer) and used the same MOS 6502 CPU as the PET. The VIC-20′s video chip, the MOS Technology VIC, was a general-purpose color video chip designed by Al Charpentier in 1977 and intended for use in inexpensive display terminals and game consoles, but Commodore could not find a market for the chip. As the Apple II gained momentum with the advent of VisiCalc in 1979, Jack Tramiel wanted a product that would compete in the same segment, to be presented at the January 1980 CES. For this reason Chuck Peddle and Bill Seiler started to design a computer named TOI (The Other Intellect).

The TOI computer failed to materialize, mostly due to the fact that it required an 80-column character display which in turn required the MOS Technology 6564 chip. However, the chip could not be used in the TOI since it required very expensive static RAM to operate fast enough. In the meantime, freshman engineer Robert Yannes at MOS Technology (then a part of Commodore) had designed a computer in his home dubbed the MicroPET and finished a prototype with some help from Al Charpentier and Charles Winterble. With the TOI unfinished, when Jack Tramiel was confronted with the MicroPET prototype, he immediately said he wanted it to be finished and ordered it to be mass-produced following a limited demonstration at the CES.

source: wikipedia

Commodore VIC 20 Gold Label (NTSC)

March 25th, 2012 No comments
Commodore VIC 20 Gold Label (NTSC)

Autopsy:

from Wikipedia:

The VIC-20 (Germany: VC-20; Japan: VIC-1001) is an 8-bit home computer which was sold by Commodore Business Machines. The VIC-20 was announced in 1980, roughly three years after Commodore’s first personal computer, the PET. The VIC-20 was the first computer of any description to sell one million units.

The VIC-20 was intended to be more economical than the PET computer. It was equipped with only 5 kB of RAM (of this, only 3583 bytes were available to the BASIC programmer) and used the same MOS 6502 CPU as the PET. The VIC-20′s video chip, the MOS Technology VIC, was a general-purpose color video chip designed by Al Charpentier in 1977 and intended for use in inexpensive display terminals and game consoles, but Commodore could not find a market for the chip.

As the Apple II gained momentum with the advent of VisiCalc in 1979, Jack Tramiel wanted a product that would compete in the same segment, to be presented at the January 1980 CES. For this reason Chuck Peddle and Bill Seiler started to design a computer named TOI (The Other Intellect).

source: wikipedia

Commodore Vic 20 yellowed but in very good conditions

November 12th, 2009 No comments
Commodore VIC-20, Yellowed but in very good condition

Autopsy:

from Wikipedia:

The VIC-20 (Germany: VC-20; Japan: VIC-1001) is an 8-bit home computer which was sold by Commodore Business Machines. The VIC-20 was announced in 1980, roughly three years after Commodore’s first personal computer, the PET. The VIC-20 was the first computer of any description to sell one million units.

The VIC-20 was intended to be more economical than the PET computer. It was equipped with only 5 KB of RAM (of this, only 3583 Bytes were available to the user) and used the same MOS 6502 CPU as the PET. The VIC-20′s video chip, the MOS Technology VIC, was a general-purpose color video chip designed by Al Charpentier in 1977 and intended for use in inexpensive display terminals and game consoles, but Commodore couldn’t find a market for the chip. As the Apple II gained momentum with the advent of VisiCalc in 1979, Jack Tramiel wanted a product that would compete in the same segment, to be presented at the January 1980 CES. For this reason Chuck Peddle and Bill Seiler started to design a computer named TOI (The Other Intellect).

The TOI computer failed to materialize, mostly due to the fact that it required an 80-column character display which in turn required the MOS Technology 6564 chip. However, the chip could not be used in the TOI since it required very expensive static RAM to operate fast enough. In the meantime, freshman engineer Robert Yannes at MOS Technology (then a part of Commodore) had designed a computer in his home dubbed the MicroPET and finished a prototype with some help from Al Charpentier and Charles Winterble.

With the TOI unfinished, when Jack Tramiel was confronted with the MicroPET prototype, he immediately said he wanted it to be finished and ordered it to be mass-produced following a limited demonstration at the CES.

source: wikipedia

Art of Commodore 100% Final

April 23rd, 2009 No comments

Description:

  • Commodore VIC-20 Generation Two
  • Commodore VIC-20 Generation One (Pet Function key style)
  • Commodore VC-20 (Pet Function key style)
  • Commodore 64 Generation One (Pet Function key style)
  • Commodore 64 Generation Two (The classic one)
  • Commodore 64 G
  • Commodore 64 Aldi
  • Commodore 16

All Commodore’s are in perfect state and working like new.

Commodore VC20 Volks Computer

April 22nd, 2009 2 comments

Autopsy:

Description:

  • Country: USA
  • Most Common: Germany
  • Rarity: Rare
  • Year: 1981

from Wikipedia:

The VIC-20 (Germany: VC-20; Japan: VIC-1001) is an 8-bit home computer which was sold by Commodore Business Machines. The VIC-20 was announced in 1980,[1] roughly three years after Commodore’s first personal computer, the PET. The VIC-20 was the first microcomputer to sell one million units.

The VIC-20 was intended to be more economical than the PET computer. It was equipped with only 5 KB of RAM (of this, only 3583 Bytes was available to the user) and used the same MOS 6502 CPU as the PET. The VIC-20′s video chip, the MOS Technology VIC, was a general-purpose color video chip designed by Al Charpentier in 1977 and intended for use in inexpensive display terminals and game consoles, but Commodore couldn’t find a market for the chip. As the Apple II gained momentum with the advent of VisiCalc in 1979, Jack Tramiel wanted a product that would compete in the same segment, to be presented at the January 1980 CES. For this reason Chuck Peddle and Bill Seiler started to design a computer named TOI (The Other Intellect).

source: wikipedia

Art of Commodore Part2 *updated*

February 4th, 2009 No comments
Art of Commodore Part2

Art of Commodore Part1

Description from Left to Right:

  • Commodore 64 II Generation Two (New Keyboard style/Mainboard with 8580)
  • Commodore 64 II Generation One (Old Keyboard style/Mainboard with 6581)
  • Commodore Plus 4
  • Commodore 116
  • Commodore 128
  • ZX Spectrum 48k
  • ZX 81 + 16k

* there are two lame computers in this photo! ;-D

Art of Commodore Part2 *beta*

January 28th, 2009 2 comments
Art of Commodore Part2

Art of Commodore Part1

Description from Left to Right:

  • Commodore 64 II Generation Two (New Keyboard style/Mainboard with 8580)
  • Commodore 64 II Generation One (Old Keyboard style/Mainboard with 6581)
  • Commodore Plus 4
  • Commodore 128

Art of Commodore *updated*

January 23rd, 2009 4 comments

Art of Commodore Art of Commodore

I have hung some commodore on the wall like paintings, i have others to hang…but my room is very small.

Description from top:

  • Commodore VIC-20 Generation One (Pet Function key style)
  • Commodore VIC-20 Generation Two
  • Commodore 64 Generation One (Pet Function key style)
  • Commodore 64 Generation Two (The classic one)
  • Commodore 64 G
  • Commodore 64 Aldi
  • Commodore 16

Commodore VIC 20 – 2nd Generation

January 22nd, 2009 No comments

Description:

  • Country: USA
  • Most Common: Europe
  • Rarity: Unrare
  • Year: 1980

The VIC-20 was intended to be more economical than the PET computer. It was equipped with only 5 KB of RAM and used the same MOS 6502 CPU as the PET. The VIC-20′s video chip, the MOS Technology VIC, was a general-purpose color video chip designed by Al Charpentier in 1977 and intended for use in inexpensive display terminals and game consoles, but Commodore couldn’t find a market for the chip.
As the Apple II gained momentum with the advent of VisiCalc in 1979, Jack Tramiel wanted a product that would compete in the same segment, to be presented at the January 1980 CES. For this reason Chuck Peddle and Bill Seiler started to design a computer named TOI (The Other Intellect).

wiki: VIC20-Wiki

Vintage Computer Collection. *Updated*

October 2nd, 2008 3 comments

This is a small part of my vintage computer collections.

A Description of the photo’s:

Photo #1: 1541 Jiffy, 1541 II Jiffy, 1581 Jiffy, C64 with a First generation motherboard + MultiKernel (Atmel Flash), Nes Pal/Ntsc, a Lame Windows PC, Debian Laptop.

Photo #2: Commodore 1084S, C64, some Original box of Commodore.

Photo #3: 1541 Original Box, Commodore Dtv PAL, Plus4, C16, C64, Spectrum Joystick Interface,Zx81, Spectrum, Vic20, C64G, C64 II, C16 Cartridges and on the wall a C64 Motherboard ;-DD

Photo #4: Zoom of C128 and C64 II logo.

Photo #5: C128 and a first version of C64 II (new case but with old Motherboard / Keyboard)

Photo #6: Amiga 600 + 1MB + CompactFlash HD.

Photo #7: Commodore 1084S, Amiga 3000 (old memories)