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Archive for the ‘Dragon Data Ltd’ Category

Thomson MO5 / Dragon 32 / Laser 310 / TRS-80 / Sharp Software

March 3rd, 2017 No comments
Thomson MO5 / Dragon 32 / Laser 310 / TRS-80 / Sharp Software

Thanks to my friend Andry for the donation of a few Software on tape.

Thomson MO5/TO7/TO9:

  • Histoire de France (M.P.S.)
  • Pays du Monde (Infogrames)

Vtech Laser 310:

  • DemostrationsBand (Vtech)

Dragon 32:

  • Backgammon (Oasis Software)
  • Invader Cube (Oasis Software)

Sharp MZ-700:

  • Anthill Raider (Solo Software)
  • Flipper 700 (Tecnomec)
  • Advoka.
  • Head Driver.
  • Egg Bas.
  • Account Management.
  • Address Data.

Timex Sinclair 1000:

  • Backgammon.

Radio Shack TRS-80:

  • Some tapes of not original software.

Dragon 64 (Dragon Data Ltd) Boxed

February 1st, 2013 No comments
Dragon 64 (Data Ltd)

Autopsy:

from Wikipedia:

The Dragon 32 and Dragon 64 are home computers that were built in the 1980s. The Dragons are very similar to the TRS-80 Color Computer (CoCo), and were produced for the European market by Dragon Data, Ltd., in Port Talbot, Wales, and for the US market by Tano of New Orleans, Louisiana. The model numbers reflect the primary difference between the two machines, which have 32 and 64 kilobytes of RAM, respectively.

In the early 1980s, the British home computer market was booming. New machines were released almost monthly. In August 1982, Dragon Data joined the fray with the Dragon 32; the Dragon 64 followed a year later. The computers sold quite well initially and attracted the interest of several independent software developers, most notably Microdeal. A magazine, Dragon User also began publication shortly after the machine’s launch.

In the private home computer market, where games were a significant driver, the Dragon suffered due to its graphical capabilities, which were inferior to contemporary machines such as the Sinclair ZX Spectrum and BBC Micro.

The Dragon was also unable to display lower-case letters easily. Some more sophisticated applications would synthesise them using high-resolution graphics modes (in the same way that user-defined characters would be designed for purely graphical applications such as games). Simpler programs just managed without lower case. This effectively locked it out of the then-blooming educational market.

As a result of these limitations, the Dragon was not a commercial success, and Dragon Data collapsed in June 1984.

Video of Chuckie Egg game for Dragon 64:

source: wikipedia archive.worldofdragon.org