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Sega SC-3000H

May 16th, 2013 No comments
Sega SC-3000H

Autopsy:

from Segaretro homepage:

The SC-3000 (Sega Computer 3000) is the first and only computer to be designed and manufactured by Sega. It was first released in July of 1983 in Japan, and serves as the home computer equivalent of the SG-1000 cartridge-based video game console. The SC-3000, often known simply as the “Sega Computer” or even just the “Sega”, is an 8-bit home computer almost identical in nature to the SG-1000, but with a built-in keyboard and support for more hardware expansions.

Unlike later Sega systems, the SC-3000 did not receive a worldwide release, but in markets were it did compete, including Japan, Australia, New Zealand, France, Italy and Finland, the computer fared well as a low price, entry-level machine for the home. By 1985 the SC-3000 had been displaced by more popular computer standards, but is nevertheless said to have fared better than the SG-1000 console on the global stage, and has a strong group of followers to this day.

The SC-3000 was also Sega’s last home computer to be released to the general public. The company would partner with Amstrad and IBM for the Amstrad Mega PC and TeraDrive respectively in later years, but other endeavours such as the extremely rare Sega AI Computer saw only a small fraction of the success the SC-3000 received, and were built with very different aims.

source: segaretro.org/SC-3000

Extreme repair of a Sega SC-3000H

May 16th, 2013 No comments

This computer was in very poor condition, almost all the traces and pitches on the Z80 CPU side was interrupted.

I had to remove the old socket and install a new one and rebuild all traces/pitches interrupted.

Sega SC-3000 Basic Level III B Cartridge

May 10th, 2013 1 comment

I thank my dear friend for the donation of the BASIC cartridge for my Sega SC-3000.

Sega Pico (NTSC-USA) Boxed

January 30th, 2013 No comments
Sega Pico (Testing game)

Autopsy:

from Wikipedia:

The Sega Pico, also known as Kids Computer Pico (キッズコンピューター・ピコ Kizzu Konpyūtā Piko?), is an electronic toy by Sega. The aim of creating the Pico was to get more young children (specifically, ages 2–8) to use video game systems. The Pico was the first Sega-branded console to carry an officially licensed game from former competitor Nintendo.

The Pico was released in 1993 in Japan and 1994 in North America and Europe. In Japan, the system was a huge success and games were developed until 2005. In North America and Europe, however, the Pico was less successful and games were only developed until 1997. The Pico was also released in South Korea, and it seems to be more successful unlike the west. To celebrate its 10th anniversary in 2003 in Japan, Sega re-released some of the Pico games. As of April 2005, 3.4 million Pico consoles and 11.2 million software cartridges had been sold.

The Sega Pico’s slogan was: “The computer that thinks it’s a toy.”

The ROM cartridges were called “Storyware,” and were book shaped. Each time a player turned the page of the cartridge the screen changed to replicate the image in the book. The games were controlled by a “magic” pen and buttons. The last page of each book features a freehand drawing mode, where the player can also insert stamps of characters shown previously in the game. All software released for the Pico received a rating from either the V.R.C. or the ESRB.

source: wikipedia

RGB + Synch Amplifier Circuit for Sega SG-1000 II (Mark 2)

September 2nd, 2012 3 comments

This is a Video RGB Hack for the console Sega SG-1000 II (Mark 2).

The Sega 315-5066 Video Chip inside the Sega SG-1000 II (Mark 2) used in the latest version of the console uses two video output formats: NTSC Composite video (converted to RF), and RGB (not connected).

The RGB Video is the stuff from which all other formats are born. Once your RGB is tapped it can be easily converted to Component or S-video, giving stunning output far superior to what the Sega SG-1000 II natively offers (only RF).

There are several caveats, of course. The biggest is the quality of the RGB output – it’s not very bright, and will result in an image without much contrast, so you will probably need to add an amplifier. Even on monitors that display a very good image without the amp you’ll sometimes find the sync signal needs an amp to generate a stable image.

I have used the same RGB/Sync Amplifier used on the PC-Engine, components and the Original schematic are shown below.

Schematic:

Components:

  • 4 x 2SC1815 (Transistor)
  • 4 x 220 μF 16v (Electrolytic capacitor)
  • 4 x 10 μF 16v (Electrolytic capacitor)
  • 4 x 75 Ω (Resistor)
  • 8 x 10 KΩ (Resistor)
  • 1 x 300 Ω (Resistor)

 

 

The three photos below show the connection between the RGB Amplifier and the PCB of the Sega SG-1000 II.

RGB + Synch Amplifier Circuit (Connections Descriptions) RGB + Synch Amplifier Circuit (Connections Descriptions) RGB + Synch Amplifier Circuit (Connections Descriptions)

Sega SG-1000 II – Mark 2 (Boxed)

August 31st, 2012 No comments
Sega SG-1000 II (close-up)

Autopsy:

TODO: Modify the console to support RGB output. When is ready i’m going to post the project.

from Wikipedia:

The SG-1000 (エスジー・セン Esujī Sen?), which stands for Sega Game 1000, was a cartridge-based video game console manufactured by Sega. This system marked Sega’s first entry into the home video game hardware business, and while the system was not popular, it provided the basis for the more successful Sega Master System.

The SG-1000 was first released to the Japanese market on July 15, 1983. Coincidentally, this is exactly the day that Nintendo’s Family Computer was released in Japan. The console reached minor success in that market and sold moderately well within Asia until 1985. The system was launched in New Zealand as released by Grandstand Leisure Limited, Australia by John Sands and in other countries, such as France, Italy, Spain, and South Africa. The console in its original form was never launched in North America.

In July 1984, Sega released an updated version of the console called the SG-1000 II. It is functionally identical to the SG-1000, but has a re-styled shell and the connector for the optional plug-in SK-1100 keyboard has been moved from the rear to the front. It was initially priced at ¥15,000. A computer version of this console, with a built-in keyboard, was called the SC-3000, which would go on to outsell the SG-1000.

The SG-1000 runs all SC-3000 games and applications, with the exception of Music and Basic Cartridges. The machine could be used just like the SC-3000, provided one had the keyboard attachment ready. In Japan the console also had an optional game card reader add-on called the Card Catcher that allowed for the use of Sega game card software. Card based software was exclusive to Japan, only cartridge based games were released in Europe and Oceania.

The Card Catcher would become built into the Sega Mark III, as well as the first version of the Master System.

source: wikipedia

Sega Megadrive II (PAL-EURO) Boxed

June 16th, 2012 No comments
Sega Megadrive II (PAL-EURO) Boxed

Autopsy:

The full review and the autopsy of the console can be found here.

Sega Genesis System Console (NTSC-USA)

May 12th, 2012 No comments
Sega Genesis System Console

Autopsy:

from Wikipedia:

The Sega Genesis is a fourth-generation video game console developed and produced by Sega. It was originally released in Japan in 1988 as Mega Drive (メガドライブ Mega Doraibu?), then in North America in 1989 as Sega Genesis, and in Europe, Australia and other PAL regions in 1990 as Mega Drive.

The reason for the two names is that Sega was unable to secure legal rights to the Mega Drive name in North America. The Sega Genesis is Sega’s third console and the successor to the Sega Master System with which it has backward compatibility when the separately sold Power Base Converter is installed.

The console was released in Japan as Mega Drive on October 29, 1988. Sega announced a North American release date for the system (as Sega Genesis) on January 9, 1989. Sega initially attempted to partner with Atari Corporation for distribution of the console in the US, but the two could not agree to terms and Sega decided to do it themselves. Sega was not able to meet the initial release date and US sales began on August 14, 1989 in New York City and Los Angeles. The Sega Genesis was released in the rest of North America later that year on September 15, 1989 with the suggested retail price of $189.99, $10 less than originally planned, and also $10 less than the competing TurboGrafx-16.

The Mega Drive’s CPU is a 16/32-bit Motorola 68000. The maximum addressable memory is 16 MB from the ROM ($00000000-00400000 – 4 MB), to the RAM ($00FF0000-00FFFFFF – 64 KB). The 68000 runs at 7.61 MHz in PAL consoles, 7.67 MHz in NTSC consoles. The Mega Drive also includes a Zilog Z80, which serves as secondary processor along with allowing complete Master System compatibility with only a passive adapter. The initial Mega Drive models used a Hitachi-made HD68HC000, while the Mega Drive 2 and later models used a Motorola MC68HC000, both fabricated in CMOS.

source: wikipedia

Sega Megadrive (PAL-EUR)

Sega Megadrive (PAL-EUR)

Autopsy:

from Wikipedia:

The Sega Megadrive is a fourth-generation video game console developed and produced by Sega. It was originally released in Japan in 1988 as Mega Drive (メガドライブ Mega Doraibu?), then in North America in 1989 as Sega Genesis, and in Europe, Australia and other PAL regions in 1990 as Mega Drive.

The reason for the two names is that Sega was unable to secure legal rights to the Mega Drive name in North America. The Sega Genesis is Sega’s third console and the successor to the Sega Master System with which it has backward compatibility when the separately sold Power Base Converter is installed.

The console was released in Japan as Mega Drive on October 29, 1988. Sega announced a North American release date for the system (as Sega Genesis) on January 9, 1989. Sega initially attempted to partner with Atari Corporation for distribution of the console in the US, but the two could not agree to terms and Sega decided to do it themselves. Sega was not able to meet the initial release date and US sales began on August 14, 1989 in New York City and Los Angeles. The Sega Genesis was released in the rest of North America later that year on September 15, 1989 with the suggested retail price of $189.99, $10 less than originally planned, and also $10 less than the competing TurboGrafx-16.

The Mega Drive’s CPU is a 16/32-bit Motorola 68000. The maximum addressable memory is 16 MB from the ROM ($00000000-00400000 – 4 MB), to the RAM ($00FF0000-00FFFFFF – 64 KB). The 68000 runs at 7.61 MHz in PAL consoles, 7.67 MHz in NTSC consoles. The Mega Drive also includes a Zilog Z80, which serves as secondary processor along with allowing complete Master System compatibility with only a passive adapter. The initial Mega Drive models used a Hitachi-made HD68HC000, while the Mega Drive 2 and later models used a Motorola MC68HC000, both fabricated in CMOS.

source: wikipedia

Sega Megadrive II (PAL-EUR)

Sega Megadrive II (PAL-EUR)

Autopsy:

The boxed version of the console can be found here.

from Wikipedia:

The Sega Megadrive is a fourth-generation video game console developed and produced by Sega. It was originally released in Japan in 1988 as Mega Drive (メガドライブ Mega Doraibu?), then in North America in 1989 as Sega Genesis, and in Europe, Australia and other PAL regions in 1990 as Mega Drive.

The reason for the two names is that Sega was unable to secure legal rights to the Mega Drive name in North America. The Sega Genesis is Sega’s third console and the successor to the Sega Master System with which it has backward compatibility when the separately sold Power Base Converter is installed.

The console was released in Japan as Mega Drive on October 29, 1988. Sega announced a North American release date for the system (as Sega Genesis) on January 9, 1989. Sega initially attempted to partner with Atari Corporation for distribution of the console in the US, but the two could not agree to terms and Sega decided to do it themselves. Sega was not able to meet the initial release date and US sales began on August 14, 1989 in New York City and Los Angeles. The Sega Genesis was released in the rest of North America later that year on September 15, 1989 with the suggested retail price of $189.99, $10 less than originally planned, and also $10 less than the competing TurboGrafx-16.

The Mega Drive’s CPU is a 16/32-bit Motorola 68000. The maximum addressable memory is 16 MB from the ROM ($00000000-00400000 – 4 MB), to the RAM ($00FF0000-00FFFFFF – 64 KB). The 68000 runs at 7.61 MHz in PAL consoles, 7.67 MHz in NTSC consoles. The Mega Drive also includes a Zilog Z80, which serves as secondary processor along with allowing complete Master System compatibility with only a passive adapter. The initial Mega Drive models used a Hitachi-made HD68HC000, while the Mega Drive 2 and later models used a Motorola MC68HC000, both fabricated in CMOS.

source: wikipedia

Sega Megadrive (NTSC-JAP) Boxed

Sega Megadrive (NTSC-JAP)

Autopsy:

from Wikipedia:

The Sega Megadrive is a fourth-generation video game console developed and produced by Sega. It was originally released in Japan in 1988 as Mega Drive (メガドライブ Mega Doraibu?), then in North America in 1989 as Sega Genesis, and in Europe, Australia and other PAL regions in 1990 as Mega Drive.

The reason for the two names is that Sega was unable to secure legal rights to the Mega Drive name in North America. The Sega Genesis is Sega’s third console and the successor to the Sega Master System with which it has backward compatibility when the separately sold Power Base Converter is installed.

The console was released in Japan as Mega Drive on October 29, 1988. Sega announced a North American release date for the system (as Sega Genesis) on January 9, 1989. Sega initially attempted to partner with Atari Corporation for distribution of the console in the US, but the two could not agree to terms and Sega decided to do it themselves. Sega was not able to meet the initial release date and US sales began on August 14, 1989 in New York City and Los Angeles. The Sega Genesis was released in the rest of North America later that year on September 15, 1989 with the suggested retail price of $189.99, $10 less than originally planned, and also $10 less than the competing TurboGrafx-16.

The Mega Drive’s CPU is a 16/32-bit Motorola 68000. The maximum addressable memory is 16 MB from the ROM ($00000000-00400000 – 4 MB), to the RAM ($00FF0000-00FFFFFF – 64 KB). The 68000 runs at 7.61 MHz in PAL consoles, 7.67 MHz in NTSC consoles. The Mega Drive also includes a Zilog Z80, which serves as secondary processor along with allowing complete Master System compatibility with only a passive adapter. The initial Mega Drive models used a Hitachi-made HD68HC000, while the Mega Drive 2 and later models used a Motorola MC68HC000, both fabricated in CMOS.

source: wikipedia

Sega SC-3000 Cartridges

January 13th, 2011 1 comment
Sega SC-3000 Cartridges

Autopsy:

Hello everyone, after the Fabio D. Bovelacci donation, i have decided to looking around for some cartridges for my Sega SC-3000. As you can see! i have found something.

The games cartridges are Japanese, but it works perfectly with my Sega SC-3000 PAL version.

Sega SC-3000 games cartridges (JAP):

  • Safari Race
  • Monaco GP
  • Zaxxon
  • Safari Hunting
  • Sinbad Mystery
  • Yamato
  • Pop Flamer
  • Pachinko II
  • Lode Runner
  • Hustle Chumy
  • Exerion
  • Champion Boxing

source: sc-3000.com

Sega SC-3000

December 28th, 2010 No comments
Sega SC-3000

Autopsy:

Many thanks to Fabio D. Bovelacci for his donation. This is my second computer (ZX-81 is the first one), i spent a significant portion of my childhood in front of this one.

from old-computers.com homepage:

The SC-3000 is a computer based on the hardware of the first videogame systems released by Sega in Japan : the SG-1000 series. It can use the same game cartridges marketed for these consoles.

The SC3000 can’t be used without a ROM cartridge, which can be either a game or language. There were three different BASIC cartridges. One came with only 1Kb of RAM (and you had only 512 bytes free !), the second with 16Kb and the last with 32Kb. In official adverts, they show a total RAM of 48Kb. This was counting the VRAM and the 32Kb BASIC cartridge…

Several great games were adapted by Sega for this computer. Several graphic characteristics of the SC-3000 are fairly close to MSX ones. For example, it was one of the first computers to offer 32 sprites. Some months later, Sega released the SC-3000 H which was the same system but with a mechanical keyboard.

This computer was also marketed by Yeno under the same name (Yeno SC 3000 & SC 3000H). It was exactly the same computer except for the Yeno brand…

source: old-computers.com sc-3000.com

Sega MasterSystem II + Alex Kidd

February 14th, 2009 1 comment

Autopsy:

The Sega MasterSystem II was originally designed to output an RF modulated (VHF) signal but with a mod you can get a better signal with the Composite Video .

Description:

  • Country: Japan
  • Most Common: Usa/Europe
  • Rarity: Unrare
  • Year: 1990

from Wikipedia:

The Sega Master System is an 8-bit cartridge-based video game console that was manufactured by Sega and was first released in 1986.[3] Its original Japanese incarnation was the Sega Mark III (although the “Master System” name has also been used in Japan).

In the European market, this console launched Sega onto a competitive level comparable to Nintendo, due to its wider availability, but failed to put a dent in the North American and Japanese markets. The Master System was released as a direct competitor to the NES/Famicom.

source: Wikipedia