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Posts Tagged ‘cartridges’

AtariMax free replacement 8mbit cartridge

September 3rd, 2010 No comments
AtariMax cartridges (1MBit / 8MBit)

Autopsy:

I bought one month ago a AtariMax 8MBit Cartridge for Atari that had the wrong label on it, it is a 1mbit in place of a 8mbit.

This is a free replacement 8mbit cartridge from Steven J.Tucker (AtariMax). Many Thanks Steven.

source: atarimax.com

Unboxing Atarimax Multi-Cart for Atari 8-bit

August 3rd, 2010 1 comment
Atarimax Maxflash Multi-Cart for Atari 8-bit.

Autopsy:

The Atarimax Maxflash Flash Cartridge System for Atari 8-bit Computers is a high quality, professionally produced cartridge creation suite for the Atari 400/800/XL/XE series computers.

Maxflash Studio Demostration:

source: atarimax.com

Atari 130 XE Boxed + Cartridges Games

July 11th, 2010 No comments
ATARI 130 XE

Autopsy:

from old-computers Homepage:

The Atari 130-XE was first shown at the Winter Las Vegas Consumer Electronic Show in 1985 (with the Atari 130 ST), it has the same characteristics as the Atari 800 XL except its added memory (128 KB instead of 64 KB for the 800 XL).

The extended memory can be used as a RAM disk, or can be accessed by bank switching routines. It was an attempt to extend the life of the old XL series, but Atari abandoned it pretty quickly to concentrate on promoting the ST series, which uses the same case style.

source: old-computers.com

Atari 65 XE Boxed + Cartridges Games

June 20th, 2010 No comments
Atari 65 XE Boxed

Autopsy:

from Wikipedia:

Jack Tramiel’s Atari Corporation produced the final machines in the 8-bit series, which were the 65XE and 130XE (XE stood for XL-Expanded). They were announced in 1985, at the same time as the initial models in the Atari ST  series, and resembled the Atari ST. Originally intended to be called the 900XLF, the 65XE was functionally equivalent to the 800XL minus the PBI connection.

The 65XE (European version) and the 130XE had the Enhanced Cartridge Interface (ECI), a semi-compatible variant of the Parallel Bus Interface (PBI). The 130XE shipped with 128 KB of memory, accessible through bank-selection.

An additional 800XE was available in Europe (mostly Eastern Europe), which was essentially a 65XE repackaged in order to ride on the popularity of the original 800XL in Europe.[citation needed] Unfortunately, the 65XE and 800XE machines sold in Eastern Europe had a buggy GTIA chip, specifically those machines made in China in 1991.

Finally, with the resurgence of the gaming industry brought on by Nintendo, Atari Corp. brought out the XE Game System (XEGS), released in 1987. The XE Game System was sold bundled with a detachable keyboard, a joystick and a light gun (XG-1), and a couple of game cartridges (Bug Hunt and Flight Simulator II). The XE Game System was essentially a repackaged 65XE, and was compatible with almost all Atari 8-bit software and hardware as a result. Bad marketing and a lack of newer releases hampered sales.

On January 1, 1992, Atari corp. officially dropped all remaining support of the 8-bit line.

source: wikipedia

Ms Pacman Commodore 64 Cartridges (like new)

June 19th, 2010 No comments

Thanks to recompute33 for your donation.

Today i picked up a MS Pacman cartridges for Commodore 64 (Like new).

Milton Bradley (MB) Vectrex / Games Cartridges

May 15th, 2010 2 comments
Milton Bradley (MB) Vectrex

Autopsy:

from wikipedia:

The Vectrex is an 8-bit video game console that was developed by Western Technologies/Smith Engineering. It was licensed and distributed first by General Consumer Electric (GCE), and then by Milton Bradley Company after their purchase of GCE. It was released in November 1982 at a retail price of $199 ($430 compensated for inflation) as Milton Bradley took over international marketing the price dropped to $150 and then $100 shortly before the video game crash of 1983. The Vectrex exited the market in early 1984.

Unlike other non-portable video game consoles, which connected to televisions and rendered raster graphics, the Vectrex has an integrated vector monitor which displays vector graphics. The monochrome Vectrex uses plastic screen overlays to generate color and various static graphics and decorations. At the time, many of the most popular arcade games used vector displays, and GCE was looking to set themselves apart from the pack by selling high-quality versions of games such as Space Wars and Armor Attack.

Vectrex comes with a built in game, the Asteroids-like Minestorm. Two peripherals were also available for the Vectrex, a light pen and a 3D imager. The Vectrex was also released in Japan under the name Bandai Vectrex Kousokusen. While it is a mainstay of disc-based console systems today, the Vectrex was part of the first generation of console systems to feature a boot screen, which also included the Atari 5200 and Colecovision.

source: wikipedia vectrex game database

Some Coleco Vision Games Cartridges

December 19th, 2009 No comments
Coleco Vision Cartridges

Cartridges list:

  • Donkey Kong by Nintendo.
  • Cosmic Avenger by Universal.
  • The Official Turbo by Sega.
  • Smurf by Peyo.

click here for the CBS Coleco Vision category.

Some Coleco Vision Games Cartridges with Instructions

November 18th, 2009 No comments

Cartridges list:

  • BurgerTime by Data East U.S.A.
  • Rocky Super Action Boxing by United Artists Corporation + Joystick Sticker.
  • WarGames by United Artists Corporation + Joystick Sticker.
  • Buck Rogers by The Dille Family Trust.

click here for the CBS Coleco Vision category.

Some Coleco Vision Games Cartridges

October 15th, 2009 No comments
ColecoVision Cartridges - Rocky & Fathom

Cartridges list:

  • Fathom by Imagic.
  • Rocky Super Action Boxing by United Artists Corporation + Joystick Sticker.

click here for the CBS Coleco Vision category.

Some Coleco Vision Games Cartridges

September 18th, 2009 1 comment
Coleco Vision Cartridges

Autopsy:

Cartridges list:

  • Mouse Trap by Exidy.
  • Zaxxon by Sega.
  • Carnival by Sega.
  • Lady Bug by Universal.
  • Donkey Kong by Nintendo.

click here for the CBS Coleco Vision category.

Philips Videopac G7000 / Two Joysticks and some Game Cartridges

September 1st, 2009 No comments
Philips Videopac G7000

Autopsy:

Cartridges list:

  • Philips Videopac #1 – Race/Spin-Out/Cryptogram.
  • Philips Videopac #18 – Laser War.
  • Philips Videopac #22 – Space Monster.
  • Philips Videopac #38 – Munchkin.
  • Philips Videopac #43 – Pickaxe Peter.

from Wikipedia:

The Magnavox Odyssey², known in Europe as the Philips Videopac G7000, in Brazil as the Philips Odyssey, in the United States as the Magnavox Odyssey² and the Philips Odyssey², and also by many other names, is a video game console released in 1978.

In the early 1970s, Magnavox was an innovator in the home video game industry. They succeeded in bringing the first home video game system to market, the Odyssey, which was quickly followed by a number of later models, each with a few technological improvements. In 1978, Magnavox, now a subsidiary of North American Philips, released the Odyssey², their new second-generation video game console.

In Europe and Brazil, the Odyssey² did very well on the market. In Europe, the console was most widely known as the Philips Videopac G7000, or just the Videopac, although branded variants were released in some areas of Europe under the names Radiola Jet 25, Schneider 7000, and Siera G7000. Philips, as Magnavox’s European parent company, used their own name rather than Magnavox’s for European marketing A rare model, the Philips Videopac G7200, was only released in Europe; it had a built-in black-and-white monitor.

Videopac game cartridges are mostly compatible with American Odyssey² units, although some games have color differences and a few are completely incompatible. A number of additional games were released in Europe that never came out in the US.

source: wikipedia videopac composite mod videopac flashcart

Some VIC-20 Games cartridges

August 30th, 2009 No comments
Some VIC-20 Games cartridges

Cartridges list:

  • VIC-1111 – 16k Ram Expander. (Manual)
  • VIC-1211A – Super Expander with 3k Ram Expansion. (Manual)
  • VIC-1213 – Machine Language Monitor. (Manual)

click here for the vic-20 cartridges category.

from Wikipedia:

As for commercial software offerings, an estimated 300 titles were available on cartridge, and another 500+ titles were available on tape. By comparison, the Atari 2600—the most popular of the video game consoles at the time—had a library of about 900 titles near the end of its production life (many were variations of another title).

Most cartridge games were ready to play as soon as VIC-20 was turned on, as opposed to games on tape which required a time-consuming loading process. Titles on cartridge included Gorf, Cosmic Cruncher, Sargon II Chess, and many others.

source: wikipedia

Some VIC-20 Games cartridges

August 26th, 2009 No comments
Some VIC-20 Cartridges

Cartridges list:

  • VIC-1905 – Jelly Monsters.
  • VIC-1907 – Jupiter Lander.
  • VIC-1910 – Radar Ratrace.
  • VIC-1912 – Mole Attack.
  • VIC-1920 – Pinball.
  • VIC-1922 – Cosmic Cruncher.

click here for the vic-20 cartridges category.

from Wikipedia:

As for commercial software offerings, an estimated 300 titles were available on cartridge, and another 500+ titles were available on tape. By comparison, the Atari 2600—the most popular of the video game consoles at the time—had a library of about 900 titles near the end of its production life (many were variations of another title).

Most cartridge games were ready to play as soon as VIC-20 was turned on, as opposed to games on tape which required a time-consuming loading process. Titles on cartridge included Gorf, Cosmic Cruncher, Sargon II Chess, and many others.

source: wikipedia

Some Coleco Vision Games Cartridges

July 29th, 2009 No comments
Coleco Vision Cartridges

Autopsy:

Cartridges list:

  • Subroc by Sega.
  • Looping by Venture Line Inc.
  • PitStop by Epyx.

VIC-20 Games cartridges + 16k Ram Expansion

July 15th, 2009 No comments
Some VIC-20 Cartridges

Cartridges list:

  • VIC-1909 – Road Race.
  • VIC-1911 – 16k RAM Cartridges.
  • VIC-1914 – Adventure Land.
  • VIC-1915 – Pirate’s Cove.
  • VIC-1917 – The Count.
  • VIC-1924 – Omega Race.

Autopsy:

from Wikipedia:

As for commercial software offerings, an estimated 300 titles were available on cartridge, and another 500+ titles were available on tape. By comparison, the Atari 2600—the most popular of the video game consoles at the time—had a library of about 900 titles near the end of its production life (many were variations of another title).

Most cartridge games were ready to play as soon as VIC-20 was turned on, as opposed to games on tape which required a time-consuming loading process. Titles on cartridge included Gorf, Cosmic Cruncher, Sargon II Chess, and many others.

source: wikipedia