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Tandy Radio Shack TRS-80 Model 4P (Low Serial #005336)

February 12th, 2012 1 comment
Tandy Radio Shack TRS-80 Model 4p

Autopsy:

from Wikipedia:

TRS-80 was Tandy Corporation’s desktop microcomputer model line, sold through Tandy’s Radio Shack stores in the late 1970s and early 1980s. The first units, ordered unseen, were delivered in November 1977, and rolled out to the stores the third week of December. The line won popularity with hobbyists, home users, and small-businesses.

Tandy Corporation’s leading position in what Byte Magazine called the “1977 Trinity” (Apple, Commodore and Tandy) had much to do with Tandy’s retailing the computer through more than 3000 of its Radio Shack (Tandy in Europe) storefronts.

The Model 4 shipped with TRSDOS 6, an enhanced version of LDOS by Logical Systems and a vastly superior operating system to Tandy’s earlier TRSDOS offerings. When the Model 4 booted into TRSDOS 6 the video display switched into 80×24 mode and the entire 64KB address space was mapped as RAM. The Model 4 was also capable of running all Model 3 software when a Model 3 operating system disk was detected and loaded during bootup with a 64×16 video mode and Model 3 ROMs mapped from address zero.
TRS-80 Model 4P.

The Model 4 also had the ability to display 640×240 or 512×192 high-resolution monochrome graphics with an optional board. A “luggable” version known as the Model 4P (1983) was a self-contained unit with a case design similar to that of a portable sewing machine.

Early versions of the Model 4 mainboard were designed to accept a Zilog Z8000 16 bit CPU upgrade board to replace the Z80 8 bit CPU but this option was never released.

source: wikipedia

New donations – C128 / C1571 / CD32 Games / Snes RGB Cable

February 5th, 2012 No comments

Today a friend has donated to me some nice things. Thanks Damiano (Manosoft).

Things that have been donated:

  • Commodore 2 x C2N.
  • Amiga CD32 Games (Rise of the Robots / Brutal Football)
  • Super Nintendo/Snes RGB  Cable with AV Power Switch.
  • Commodore 128 (Only Box)
  • Commodore 1571 (Only Box)
  • A unopened box of 10 Floppy Disk FujiFilm 5″ 1/4
  • Catalog of Jackson 1987-88.

IBM 5155 with carry Bag

February 3rd, 2012 No comments
IBM 5155

Autopsy:

from Wikipedia:

The IBM Portable Personal Computer 5155 model 68 was an early portable computer developed by IBM after the success of Compaq’s suitcase-size portable machine (the Compaq Portable). It was released in February, 1984, and was eventually replaced by the IBM Convertible.

The Portable was basically a PC/XT motherboard, transplanted into a Compaq-style luggable case. The system featured 256 kibibytes of memory (expandable to 512 KiB), an added CGA card connected to an internal monochrome (amber) composite monitor, and one or two half-height 5.25″ 360K floppy disk drives. Unlike the Compaq Portable, which used a dual-mode monitor and special display card, IBM used a stock CGA board and a composite monitor, which had lower resolution. It could however, display color if connected to an external monitor or television.

The floppy controller card was the same as found in the IBM XT and supported up to four 360K drives (two internal, two external) but was not compatible with the higher-capacity drives then gaining in popularity, notably the 5.25″ quad-density (“1.2MB”) drives that were standard in the IBM AT and 3.5″ 720K drives.

source: wikipedia

Unboxing C64Anabalt / Blok Copy & F.Narzod C64 Cartridges

January 30th, 2012 No comments
C64Anabalt / Blok Copy & F.Narzod C64 Cartridges

Autopsy:

Today i’m very happy to present three new cartridges for the Commodore 64.

Nowadays, i’m very pleased to see new cartridges for Commodore 64. Many years are gone but this computer doesn’t want to die and honestly i am very happy.

If you like to purchase these fantastic games go here.

source: rgcd.co.uk

Atari 2600 Jr (Long Rainbow)

January 30th, 2012 No comments
Atari 2600 Jr (Long Rainbow)

Autopsy:

This version of Atari 2600 console was missing in my collection.

from Wikipedia:

The Atari 2600 is a video game console released in October 1977 by Atari, Inc. It is credited with popularizing the use of microprocessor-based hardware and cartridges containing game code, instead of having non-microprocessor dedicated hardware with all games built in.

The first game console to use this format was the Fairchild Channel F; however, the Atari 2600 receives credit for making the plug-in concept popular among the game-playing public.

The console was originally sold as the Atari VCS, for Video Computer System. Following the release of the Atari 5200, in 1982, the VCS was renamed “Atari 2600″, after the unit’s Atari part number, CX2600. The 2600 was typically bundled with two joystick controllers, a conjoined pair of paddle controllers, and a cartridge game—initially Combat and later Pac-Man.

source: wikipedia

Commodore motherboards repairs in one hour and half

January 15th, 2012 3 comments

Commodore motherboards repairs in one hour and half I am very happy to have repaired for my friend four PCB Commodore in one and half hour.

The defects are:

  • Motherboard Commodore 64 ASSY 250466 with IEC bus broken. (replaced ic 7406 – U8)
  • Motherboard Commodore 64 ASSY 250407 with a Video Output problem with some programs, like FIBR File Manager. (replaced ic 6526 – U2)
  • Motherboard Commodore 64 ASSY 250425 with strange character at startup. (replaced ic 4264 – U12)
  • Motherboard Commodore Floppy 1541 ASSY 1540050 REV C with IEC bus broken. (replaced ic 7406 – UB1 and ic 7414 – UA1)

New donations – Spectrum +2 Boxed / Joy CD32 / C2N old model

January 13th, 2012 No comments

Today a friend has donated to me some nice things. Thanks Damiano (Manosoft).

Things that have been donated:

  • Sinclair ZX Spectrum +2 Boxed.
  • Commodore CD32 Joypad Brand new.
  • VIC-20 Expansion Cartridge.
  • Commodore C2N old model.
  • Joystick Microswitch – The Bug from Cheetah.

Olivetti Diskette 5.25 ETS

January 8th, 2012 1 comment
Olivetti Diskette 5.25 ETS

Autopsy:

I found during my moving house a few boxes of unopened Floppy Disk 5.25 of Olivetti.

My Modern PC with a 5.25 Floppy Drive

January 6th, 2012 2 comments

My Modern PC with a 5.25 Floppy Drive My Modern PC with a 5.25 Floppy Drive (Epson SD-600).

This Floppy Drive model works perfectly with the programs: Omniflop / winImage / raWrite.

Download: Diskette Configuration Guide (870)

Atari 800XL Ultimate 1Mb Installation

January 5th, 2012 1 comment

Here you can find the photos that show how is easy to install the interface Ultimate 1Mb module by Candle’o’Sin.

About the latest fix (RD4 & RD5) i have chose to put the resistors in the ribbon cable.

source: spiflash.org

Re-found my USRobotics Courier HST v34 Boxed

December 30th, 2011 1 comment
USRobotics Courier HST v34

After many years, i’ve finally re-found in a box one of my USRobotics Courier HST Modem v34 upgraded to 33.6Kbps.

I used this modem for my BBS ‘Hidden Power’, before this version of USRobotics i had the first  model that was much bigger and slower.

Donation: Apple iMac G3 “Bondi Blue” M5521

December 28th, 2011 No comments
IMG_0758

Autopsy:

from Wikipedia:

The iMac is a range of all-in-one Macintosh desktop computers built by Apple. It has been the primary part of Apple’s consumer desktop offerings since its introduction in 1998, and has evolved through five distinct forms.

The announcement of the iMac in 1998 was a source of discussion and anticipation among commentators, Mac fans, and detractors. Opinions were divided over Apple’s drastic changes to the Macintosh hardware. At the time, Apple was trying to improve its retail strategy. Apple declared that “the back of our computer looks better than the front of anyone else’s”.

Apple declared the ‘i’ in iMac to stand for “Internet”; it also represented the product’s focus as a personal device (‘i’ for “individual”). Attention was given to the out-of-box experience: the user needed to go through only two steps to set up and connect to the Internet. “There’s no step 3!” was the catch-phrase in a popular iMac commercial narrated by actor Jeff Goldblum.

Another commercial, dubbed “Simplicity Shootout”, pitted seven-year-old Johann Thomas and his border collie Brodie, with an iMac, against Adam Taggart, a Stanford University MBA student, with an HP Pavilion 8250, in a race to set up their computers. Johann and Brodie finished in 8 minutes and 15 seconds, whereas Adam was still working on it by the end of the commercial. Apple later adopted the ‘i’ prefix across its consumer hardware and software lines, such as the iPod, iBook, iPhone, iPad and various pieces of software such as the iLife suite and iWork and the company’s media player/store, iTunes.

source: wikipedia

Apple Power Macintosh 4400/200

December 28th, 2011 No comments
Apple Power Macintosh 4400/200

Autopsy:

from Wikipedia:

The Power Macintosh 4400 (also known as the Power Macintosh 7220 in some markets) was a mid-to-high-end Macintosh personal computer designed, manufactured and sold by Apple Computer from 1996 until 1998. The Power Macintosh 4400 was rather different from most other Macintosh models, in that the floppy disk drive is on the left rather than right, and like the Centris 650, the casing is made of metal rather than plastic. Apple did this to reduce production costs, and in addition also used more industry standard components.

It was also available in a PC compatible system with a 166 MHz DOS card containing 16 Mb of RAM. The first 4400 model was only sold to the Europe market, an updated 200 MHz 603e model was released in the United States in February 1997 as the Power Macintosh 4400.

The Power Macintosh 4400 is known as the Power Macintosh 7220 in Australia and Asia, where the number 4 is considered unlucky. The machine was always considered a bit of an oddball, and had a reputation as being one of Apple’s less well designed and performing machines.

source: wikipedia

Bondwell-16 (BW16)

December 27th, 2011 No comments
Bondwell-16

Autopsy:

from Wikipedia:

Bondwell was a US manufacturer of personal computers during the 1980s. In the early 1980s, Bondwell sold a line of Z80, CP/M-80 based Osborne-like luggables such as the models Bondwell-12, Bondwell-14 (1984) and Bondwell-16 (1985). An exceptional feature in these was an inbuilt speech synthesizer.

Their prices were exceptionally affordable for the time, although significant trade-offs were made in regard durability, for instance the chassis was rather flimsy plastic, falling far short of the ruggedness usually expected of luggables. The fanless power supply unit, located under the motherboard, often caused trouble. The choice of peripheral I/O devices made the use of interrupts virtually impossible.

The Bondwell-12 was a “luggable” portable computer with a built-in 9 inch (23 cm) monochrome CRT display, equipped with 64 kiB of internal memory, CP/M 2.2 and two single-sided, double density, 5.25 inch floppy disk drives (180 kiB). The Bondwell-14 had 128 kiB of memory, CP/M 3.0 and two double-sided drives (360 kiB). The Bondwell-16 had CP/M 3.0, one double-sided drive and a hard disk drive with a capacity of a bit less than 10 MiB.

The Bondwell-2 (1985) was a laptop computer with 64 kiB of memory, CP/M 2.2 and one single-sided, double density 3.5 inch floppy disk (360 kiB). 256 and 512 kiB memory extensions were available. It was one of the earliest laptops, as well as one of the few battery-powered CP/M computers.

source: wikipedia

Commodore PET 8296-D

December 4th, 2011 9 comments
Commodore PET 8296-D

Autopsy:

from Wikipedia:

The Commodore PET (Personal Electronic Transactor) was a home/personal computer produced from 1977 by Commodore International. A top-seller in the Canadian and United States educational markets, it was Commodore’s first full-featured computer, and formed the basis for their entire 8-bit product line.

The PET 2001 was announced at the Winter CES in January 1977 and the first 100 units were shipped later that year in October. However, the PET was back-ordered for months and to ease deliveries, early in 1978 Commodore decided to cancel the 4 kB version.

Although the machine was fairly successful, there were frequent complaints about the tiny calculator-like keyboard, often referred to as a “chiclet keyboard” because the keys resembled the gum candy. This was addressed in upgraded “dash N” and “dash B” versions of the 2001, which put the cassette tape recorder outside the case, and included a much larger keyboard with a full stroke motion. Internally a newer motherboard was used, along with an upgrade from static RAM to dynamic RAM and 8, 16, or 32 KB, known as the 2001-N-8, 2001-N-16 or 2001-N-32, respectively.

Sales of the newer machines were strong, and Commodore then introduced the models to Europe. The result was the CBM 3000 series (‘CBM’ standing for Commodore Business Machines), which included the 3008, 3016 and 3032 models. Like the 2001-N-8, the 3008 was quickly dropped.

The final version of what could be thought of as the “classic” PET was the PET 4000 series. This was essentially the later model 2000 series, but with a larger black-and-green monitor and a newer version of Commodore’s BASIC programming language.

Commodore tried to update the PET line with a new redesign called the CBM-II series (also known as the B series). These were not as successful and were ultimately abandoned. However, due to demand, the original PET machines were revived and the CBM-II case style was retained. These were known as the SK’s (due to the separated keyboard). They also had a swivel monitor. Originally, standard 8032 boards were retrofitted into these cases. Later the SK models got a new mainboard that already included the 64 kB extension directly on the board and were sold as 8296 or, with a built-in 8250 dual disk drive, as 8296-D.

source: wikipedia