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Atari The Educator / Atari 1025 Printer / Atari 1030 Modem (all Boxed)

May 30th, 2015 No comments

Atari The Educator

Atari The Educator (Boxed)

The package includes:

  • Basic Cartridge.
  • Software & State Capital software on tape.
  • The Program Recorder Atari 410.

Download: Atari Educator Owners Guide (568)

Atari 1025 80-Column Printer

Atari 1025 Printer (Boxed)

Printer Specifications:

  • 40 cps (80-column 10 cpi mode)
  • 5 cpi expanded (40 col), 10 cpi (80 col), 16.7 cpi condensed (132-col)
  • 5×7 character dot matrix.
  • Buffer: 132 chrs at 16.7 cpi, 80 chrs at 10 cpi.
  • Paper: roll,fanfold,single sheets. optional:roll paper holder, tractor feed.

Atari 1030 Modem

Atari 1030 Modem (Boxed)

With the introduction of Atari all new XL line of computers came the all new Atari 1030 direct connect modem. The modem had a very unique feature packed into it. Just like the Atari 850 interface, the Atari 1030 modem had not only its device driver in ROM which would automatically upload into the computers memory, but also its software as well.

The Atari 1030 came with an on-board software package called ModemLink which would automatically upload into the computers memory. However there was a catch, like all previous Atari software, ModemLink had no provisions for Uploading or Downloading software, also in order to use the on-board ModemLink software any disk drives that were connected to your system had to be turned OFF.

Later Atari 1030′s were packaged with “The New Atari 1030 Software Package” which was a diskette with Amodem, Tscope and DiskLink software. Amodem was written by Jim Steinbrecher of Atari telecom fame, Tscope was written by Joe Miller and was for use with Compuserve.

Gallery:

source: atarimuseum.com

Atari 400 PAL / Communicator I & II / Bookkeeper / Programmer …

March 4th, 2015 No comments
Atari 400 PAL

The Atari 8-bit family is a series of 8-bit home computers introduced by Atari, Inc. in 1979 and manufactured until 1992. All are based on the MOS Technology 6502 CPU running at 1.79 MHz, roughly twice that of similar designs, and were the first home computers designed with custom co-processor chips. This architecture allowed the Atari designs to offer graphics and sound capabilities that were more advanced than contemporary machines like the Apple II or Commodore PET, and gaming on the platform was a major draw – Star Raiders is widely considered the platform’s killer app. Machines with similar performance would not appear until the BBC Micro in late 1981 and the Commodore 64 in 1982.

The original Atari 400 and 800 models were released with a series of plug-n-play peripherals that used Atari’s unique “SIO” serial bus system. Over the following decade several versions of the same basic design were released, including the XL and XE series of computers and matching peripherals. All of these used the same basic logical design, with various changes to the physical layout to lower production costs as chipmaking and manufacturing processes improved over time. The early machines were expensive to build, but dependable. Later models like the XEs were greatly cost-reduced and generally not as robust. Sub-models of these later designs were sold into the eastern European market after sales of the main lineup had ended.

Overall, the Atari 8-bit computer line was a commercial success, selling two million units during its major production run between late 1979 and mid-1985, putting its sales on par with machines like the Sinclair ZX Spectrum and TI-99/4A. Its primary competition in the worldwide market was the Commodore 64, by far the best selling computer of the 8-bit era. Atari also found a strong market in Eastern Europe and had something of a renaissance in the early 1990s as these countries joined a uniting Europe. Some estimates place sales during this period at another two million units.

Atari 400 inside the package:

Atari 400 PAL

Package Contents:

  • Atari 400 Home Computer.
  • Manuals.
  • External Power Supply.
  • 48k Ram Expansion Kit (this one was added by me and not included in the original packaging)

Atari 825 – 80 Column printer:

Atari 825 - 80 Column Printer

Atari introduced with its Atari 400 and 800 series computers its first 80 Column printer.   The Atari 825 which actually a repackaged Centronics 737 printer.   Earlier models had limited capabilities, the later 825 models with the extended basic character set had the capability of producing the Atari ATASCII graphics character set.  The Atari 825 required the use of the Atari 850 interface module to allow it to communicate with the Atari 400 and 800 computer because it had a Centronic parallel interface on it instead of the Atari SIO interface which the Atari 820 and Atari 822 printers had built in.

The B Key 400:

The B Key 400

The B Key 400 is a replacement keyboard for the keyboard membrane of the Atari 400.

Read more…

Atari 800XL Upgrade: VBXe / Simple Stereo + U-Switch / Side 2

February 4th, 2015 No comments
Zoe is trying to play at Donkey Kong

Atari 800XL Upgrading.

Installation and preparing:

  • VBXE v2.1 Interface Installation.
  • Simple Stereo + U-Switch Installation.
  • Formatting and partitioning CF Card (Sandisk ULTRA 2Gb) for the SIDE 2 Cartridge/SDX.

Software update:

  • Update the Ultimate 1MB (First batch 2011) Flash AM29040BL.
  • Update Ultimate 1MB (First batch 2011) Xilinx XC95144XL JTAG Firmware (v1 to v2)

Upgrade/Fix:

  • Fixed some wrong connections of the old installation from the Ultimate 1MB to the Atari 800XL PCB.
  • Removed the RF Modulator and installation of a Female DIN (8 pin + GND) for the RGB output + RGB CTRL + SYNC + AUDIO (Stereo)
  • I have also made a cable from a male DIN (8 pin) to Scart, fully shielded of a four meters lengths.

All these interfaces can be purchased on the lotharek website.

Some photos of the installation:

Atari 800 Boxed (UK-PAL) – Atari 810 Boxed – Atari 410 Boxed

December 26th, 2014 No comments
Atari 800 (UK-PAL)

The Atari 8-bit family is a series of 8-bit home computers introduced by Atari, Inc. in 1979 and manufactured until 1992. All are based on the MOS Technology 6502 CPU running at 1.79 MHz, roughly twice that of similar designs, and were the first home computers designed with custom co-processor chips. This architecture allowed the Atari designs to offer graphics and sound capabilities that were more advanced than contemporary machines like the Apple II or Commodore PET, and gaming on the platform was a major draw – Star Raiders is widely considered the platform’s killer app. Machines with similar performance would not appear until the BBC Micro in late 1981 and the Commodore 64 in 1982.

The original Atari 400 and 800 models were released with a series of plug-n-play peripherals that used Atari’s unique “SIO” serial bus system. Over the following decade several versions of the same basic design were released, including the XL and XE series of computers and matching peripherals. All of these used the same basic logical design, with various changes to the physical layout to lower production costs as chipmaking and manufacturing processes improved over time. The early machines were expensive to build, but dependable. Later models like the XEs were greatly cost-reduced and generally not as robust. Sub-models of these later designs were sold into the eastern European market after sales of the main lineup had ended.

Overall, the Atari 8-bit computer line was a commercial success, selling two million units during its major production run between late 1979 and mid-1985, putting its sales on par with machines like the Sinclair ZX Spectrum and TI-99/4A. Its primary competition in the worldwide market was the Commodore 64, by far the best selling computer of the 8-bit era. Atari also found a strong market in Eastern Europe and had something of a renaissance in the early 1990s as these countries joined a uniting Europe. Some estimates place sales during this period at another two million units.

The early machines: 400 and 800

Atari 800 (UK-PAL) Boxed

Management identified two sweet spots for the new computers: a low-end version known as Candy, and a higher-end machine known as Colleen (named after two attractive Atari secretaries). The primary difference between the two models was marketing;

Atari 800 (UK-PAL)

Atari marketed Colleen as a computer, and Candy as a game machine or hybrid game console. Colleen would include user-accessible expansion slots for RAM and ROM, two 8 KB cartridge slots, RF and monitor output (including two pins for separate luma and chroma) and a full keyboard, while Candy used a plastic “membrane keyboard”, non-accessible internal slots for memory, and only RF output for video.

Atari 810 Boxed

The Atari 810 Disk Drive was Atari’s first disk drive for its line of Atari 400/800 computers. Providing 88K of storage per disk side, the 810 gave Atari computer users the ability to quickly store and retrieve documents and program files to and from the storage device. Up to 4 Atari 810′s could be daisy chained together via the Atari SIO bus for a total of almost 360K of on-line random access file storage and retrieval.

The Atari 810 came in two different versions; the Tandon mech version and the MPI mech version. The Atari 810 is rather large compared to other companies disk drives and has an external 9Vac power supply. The reason why the drive is so large is that there is no disk drive controller in any of the Atari 400/800 computers, instead each device that connects to an Atari computer through its SIO bus is actually an intelligent device with its own intelligent communications controller and floppy disk controller.

The case design was conceived by Kevin McKinsey of Atari’s Home Computer Industrial Design group. The case is interesting in that the top and bottom covers are actually the same part made to assemble the top and bottom sides. Adhesive labels on the back of the 810 would block unused ports on the topside of the cover.

Atari 410 Boxed

The Atari 410 came in 2 different versions, the above shown is the Atari 410a Tawain version. The Program Recorder was well built and strudy with built in power supply and SIO cable, the 410 didn’t need a bukly external power pak like most other Atari 400/800 components, how the SIO cable being built in and the Program Recorder having no daisy chain port on the unit meant that it had to be placed at the end of the SIO chain.

The original idea of the SIO (Serial I/O) port on the Atari computers was that it was to be used only for the Data cassette drive, however its functionality was extended so that it could use all Atari peripherals including disk drives, printers and modem. The Atari 410/410a had a unique feature exclusively used by Atari. They could play two seperate tracks on a tape, this proved very useful for interactive programs where a user would run a program and would hear audio music/speech while the other track would load the next part of the program.

Below a collection of a high-quality photos

source: wikipedia atarimuseum.com

Atari 7800 ProSystem (NTSC) Repair

November 3rd, 2014 No comments

Atari 7800 ProSystem (NTSC) Repair.

Defect:

  • The console doesn’t power on.

Replaced parts:

  • Replaced 1 x Push Button. Recovered from a PCB of an Atari 7800 that lying inside the box of the spare parts.

Atari Disk Drive 1050 Repair

May 25th, 2014 No comments

Atari Disk Drive 1050 #1

Defect:

  • SIO bus unresponsive.

Replaced parts:

  • Replaced 1 x LM3086N (U1)

Atari Disk Drive 1050 #2

Defect:

  • SIO bus unresponsive + no reset cycle of the Disk drive on poweron.

Replaced parts:

  • Replaced 1 x RAM-I/O-Timer (RIOT) 6532 (U7)

The Atari CX-77 Touch Tablet (Boxed)

April 6th, 2014 1 comment
The Atari Touch Tablet (close-up)

I thank my dear friend that gave me the Atari Touch Tablet.

Autopsy:

The Atari Touch Tablet was a well designed and brilliant idea. Giving the user the ability to use a virtual sheet of paper and pen, they could draw, drag and drop, paint and erase images with the included Atari Artist program.

Perhaps given more time, the Touch Tablet could have been used for many other innovative ideas and perhaps vertical market applications. The Atari CX-77 Touch Tablet was designed by Tom Palecki formerly of Atari’s Industrial Design group.

source: atarimuseum.com

Atari 800XL repaired for a friend

March 3rd, 2013 1 comment

I have repaired an Atari 800XL for a friend. The failure was caused by a faulty cpu, the computer freezes after 10 minutes of operation, using an oscilloscope i have noticed that the clock pin of the cpu did not give me more signal but when i have used the synthetic ice spray on the cpu has resumed to work.

This type of cpu (Atari customized 6502 – C014806-12 Sally) is not easy to find but fortunately a friend of mine (Carlo) has found a spare part for me.

Atari 1200XL SIO 5v Enabled / Repairing Keyboard

December 30th, 2012 No comments

I have gathered all photos of some phases of the work that i have done on the Atari 1200XL.

Below the descriptions:

  • SIO 5v Enabled (you have to short-circuit the resistor R63 to get the 5v on the SIO of the Atari 1200XL)
  • Repairing Keyboard (i have stretched the springs of a few keys for make the right pressure. The work must be completed using the liquid graphite where the contacts are more ruined)

Atari 1200XL Boxed

December 30th, 2012 1 comment
Atari 1200XL (NTSC)

Autopsy:

from AtariMuseum homepage:

In 1982 Atari’s Home Computer Division (HCD) introduced the new replacement computer to its aging Atari 400/800 line. The new computer brought to Atari’s home computers line a high-tech and sleek low profile modern look. The case design and the “XL Look” were created by Regan Cheng of Atari’s Industrial Design group. The all new design took the 7 separate boards that made up the Atari 800 (Main, Power, CPU, OS and 3 16K Memory boards) and integrated them into a single motherboard with 64K of memory. The system also brought with it probably “THE” best keyboard for any Atari system.    

The system featured many new internal and external enhancements. Some of the obvious ones were the new Function keys and built-in HELP key that programmers could incorporate their usage into future programs. The tangle of wires from the system were now out of the back making for a clean and uncluttered arrangement. The cartridge port and controller jacks were now on the left side of the system. The new OS was designed for a new era of SIO “Plug n Play” devices to automatically load their device drivers and even on-board applications right into the 1200XL memory, also an International Character Set and built-in Diagnostic features were now part of the system. Other OS enhancements were included as well.    

However the downside was that many programs by both 3rd party companies and even Atari itself were incompatible with this new OS in the machine. The loss of 2 of the 4 original controller jacks from the earlier Atari 400/800 systems didn’t seem like much of a big deal to the 1200XL engineers, however the end users did seem to mind. The system was supposed to have a better video display output signal, however to most end users, the system appeared to have a fuzzier display then the Atari 800. The true sticking point for consumers:  No expansion whatsoever.   While the idea of a “Closed Box” design seemed like a good idea to Atari’s Marketing Department, the consumer felt exactly the opposite.

Atari’s whole design philosophy for their home computer line was that these would be Consumer Oriented, not Hobbyist Oriented Systems. Therefore that meant buffering the user from the actual electronics and chips within the machines. This design was very well executed on the Atari 800 with its easy to remove top cover and its various OS and Memory modules fitted into easy to install packages. The SIO connector also gave users a universal, easy to handle and understand expansion system. Atari felt it could take this philosophy to the extreme with the 1200XL and completely cut the users off from ANY internal access. Even the simplest of users still wanted to tinker and expand their systems and the 1200XL just didn’t give them the flexibility found in Apple ][e’s, C64s or Atari’s original 800 line of computers. The collective shortcomings of the 1200XL unfortunately overshadowed its many new enhancements. Atari’s new prodigy became its “Edsil” The introduction of the new 1200XL actually increased sales of the Atari 800. Users began to buy 800′s in fear that they would be stuck with a closed and incompatible system.

Atari 1200XL Video:

source: atarimuseum.com

Atari 800 (NTSC)

November 11th, 2012 No comments
Atari 800 (NTSC)

Autopsy:

from MyOldComputers.com:

The year was 1978. Atari was at the top of the video gamming world with its 2600 VCS game console. Atari management looked around and saw a new and potentially lucrative market just beginning to take shape. This market was the Home Computer Market. They saw a market with relatively few major competitors and Atari was in a great position to market a computer of their own. They, after all, were a trusted household name, everyone owned an Atari or knew someone who did!

So December of 1978 Atari introduced the 400 and 800 series computers. The actual computers were not delivered until late 1979 due to production problems. The 400 was a scaled down version of the Atari 800. Introduced as an entry level computer based on the same MOSTEK 6502A processor running at 1.70 MHz with 16K of user RAM built in. It had a membrane style keyboard (not very touch type friendly) with 62 touch sensitive keys and 4 special keys to the right of the keyboard.

It stood out amongst the other computer offerings of the day with its graphics and sound capabilities. It was capable of producing 128 colors on the screen using the CTIA video processor and up to 256 colors with the upgraded GTIA video processor chip used on later versions of the computer. The 400 was first amongst the early computers to be able to display 4 programmable screen objects simultaneously called ‘Player-missiles’ (also known as ‘Sprites’ on Commodore computers). This was at a time when the most computers produced only monochrome displays or very primitive 8 color screens. The graphics were handled by a custom chip called the “ANTIC” (CTIA/GTIA). This chip was designed to work as a sort of co-processor to take the work load away from the main processor to display graphics and color on the screen.

The team that developed the custom chips inside the 400 and 800 was headed by Jay Miner who later, after leaving Atari, headed the teams who developed the custom chips that surrounded the Motorola MC68000 processor that powered arguably the most advanced computer of its time, The Amiga 1000!

source: myoldcomputers.com

Atari 400 (PAL-UK)

October 13th, 2012 No comments
Atari 400 (PAL-UK)

Autopsy:

from MyOldComputers.com:

The year was 1978. Atari was at the top of the video gamming world with its 2600 VCS game console. Atari management looked around and saw a new and potentially lucrative market just beginning to take shape. This market was the Home Computer Market. They saw a market with relatively few major competitors and Atari was in a great position to market a computer of their own. They, after all, were a trusted household name, everyone owned an Atari or knew someone who did!

So December of 1978 Atari introduced the 400 and 800 series computers. The actual computers were not delivered until late 1979 due to production problems. The 400 was a scaled down version of the Atari 800. Introduced as an entry level computer based on the same MOSTEK 6502A processor running at 1.70 MHz with 16K of user RAM built in. It had a membrane style keyboard (not very touch type friendly) with 62 touch sensitive keys and 4 special keys to the right of the keyboard.

It stood out amongst the other computer offerings of the day with its graphics and sound capabilities. It was capable of producing 128 colors on the screen using the CTIA video processor and up to 256 colors with the upgraded GTIA video processor chip used on later versions of the computer. The 400 was first amongst the early computers to be able to display 4 programmable screen objects simultaneously called ‘Player-missiles’ (also known as ‘Sprites’ on Commodore computers). This was at a time when the most computers produced only monochrome displays or very primitive 8 color screens. The graphics were handled by a custom chip called the “ANTIC” (CTIA/GTIA). This chip was designed to work as a sort of co-processor to take the work load away from the main processor to display graphics and color on the screen.

The team that developed the custom chips inside the 400 and 800 was headed by Jay Miner who later, after leaving Atari, headed the teams who developed the custom chips that surrounded the Motorola MC68000 processor that powered arguably the most advanced computer of its time, The Amiga 1000!

source: myoldcomputers.com

Atari 1040 STe

September 29th, 2012 1 comment
Atari 1040 STe

Autopsy:

from Wikipedia:

The Atari ST is a home computer released by Atari Corporation in June 1985. It was commercially available from that summer into the early 1990s. The “ST” officially stands for “Sixteen/Thirty-two”,[2] which referred to the Motorola 68000′s 16-bit external bus and 32-bit internals. Due to its graphical user inferface, it was known as the “Jackintosh”, a reference to Jack Tramiel.

The Atari ST was part of the 16/32 bit generation of home computers, based on the Motorola 68000 CPU noted for 128 kB of RAM or more, a graphical user interface, and 3½” microfloppy disks as storage. It was similar to the Apple Macintosh and its simple design allowed the ST to precede the Commodore Amiga’s commercial release by almost two months. The Atari ST was also the first personal computer to come with a bit-mapped color GUI, using a version of Digital Research’s GEM released that February.

The ST was primarily a competitor to the Apple Macintosh and the Commodore Amiga systems. Where the Amiga had a graphics accelerator and wavetable synthesis, the ST had a simple frame buffer and a 3 voice synthesizer chip but with a CPU faster clocked, and had a high-resolution monochrome display mode, ideal for business and CAD. In some markets, particularly Germany, the machine gained a strong foothold as a small business machine for CAD and Desktop publishing work. The Atari ST also enjoyed some market popularity in Canada.

The ST was also the first home computer with integrated MIDI support. Thanks to its built-in MIDI, it enjoyed success for running music-sequencer software and as a controller of musical instruments among amateurs and professionals alike, being used in concert by bands and performers such as Jean Michel Jarre, Madonna, Eurythmics, Tangerine Dream, Fatboy Slim, and 1990s UK dance act 808 State, as well as naming German digital hardcore band Atari Teenage Riot.

The ST was later superseded by the Atari STE, Atari TT, Atari MEGA STE and Falcon computers.

In late 1989, Atari released the 520STE and 1040STE (also written STE), enhanced version of the ST with improvements to the multimedia hardware and operating system. It featured an increased color palette of 4096 colors from the ST’s 512 (though the maximum displayable palette of these without programming tricks was still limited to 16 in the lowest 320×200 resolution, and even fewer in higher resolutions), Genlock support, and a graphics co-processor chip called Blitter, which could quickly move large blocks of data (most particularly, graphics sprites) around in RAM. It also included a new 2-channels digital sound chip that could play 8-bit stereo samples in hardware at up to 50 kHz.

Two enhanced joystick ports (EJP) were added (two normal joysticks could be plugged into each port with an adaptor), with the new connectors placed in more easily-accessed locations on the side of the case. The enhanced joystick ports were re-used in Atari’s Jaguar console, and are compatible. RAM was now much more simply upgradable via SIMMs. Despite all of this, it still ran at 8 MHz.

Atari STe: More Or Less Zero by Dead Hackers Society on real Hardware.

source: wikipedia

Unboxing SIO2SD Micro by Panos Santos

July 14th, 2012 1 comment
SIO2SD Micro (testing)

Autopsy:

The SIO2SD is a device that allows you to load games/applications into any 8-bit Atari XL/XE computers via SIO interface from SD cards.

This version is like the original SIO2SD (based to latest schematic “version 2″) but in a smaller form with some improvements by Panos.

Panos improvements:

  • As for the cpu the latest “low consumption” ATMega32A microcontroller in smd form.
  • The 74LVC245 who guarantees good data transfer between the microcontroller and SDcard, in proper voltage levels also.
  • New 47nf capacitors for better button response.
  • Extra resistor and capacitor added in output of low dropout voltage regulator, for better voltage stability particularly at “no load” condition. As result of that is much higher reliability and compatibility with more SD cards.
  • New tactile switches with smooth feeling for more comfortable use.
  • Push on-Push off type SD connector.

source: atariage.com/forums

Atari XE-System (XEGS) with Accessories

June 15th, 2012 No comments
Atari XE-System (XEGS) with Accessories

Autopsy:

from Wikipedia:

The Atari XE Video Game System (Atari XEGS) is a video game console released by Atari Corporation in 1987. Based on the Atari 65XE computer, the XEGS is compatible with the existing Atari 8-bit computer software library.

Additionally, it is able to operate as a stand alone console or full computer with the addition of its specially designed keyboard. In computer mode, it’s able to use the full line of peripherals released for the 8-bit computer line. Shipping in a console with joystick only and a deluxe model with a separate keyboard, joystick and light gun, the console failed in the marketplace, and was succeeded by the Atari Jaguar.

The XEGS shipped with the Atari 8-bit version of Missile Command built in, Flight Simulator II, and Bug Hunt which was compatible with the light gun. As the XEGS is compatible with the earlier 8-bit software, many games released under the XEGS banner were simply older games rebadged, to the extent that some games were shipped in the old Atari 400/800 packaging, with only a new sticker to indicate that they were intended for the XEGS.

The XEGS was released in a basic model with a grey colored standard CX-40 joystick, and the deluxe model bundled with the joystick and two peripherals: a keyboard, which allowed it to function as a home computer, and the XG-1 light gun – the first light gun produced by Atari, which is also compatible with the Atari 7800 and Atari 2600. Packages containing only a console and a joystick were also available, with the keyboard and the lightgun available separately.

source: wikipedia