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Atari Program Recorder Model 410 (Boxed)

February 18th, 2018 No comments
Atari Program Recorder Model 410 (Boxed)

This version of the Atari 410 Cassette Recorder differs from the one inside the “Atari – The Educator” box only for the additional colored box that hold the simple one in white cardboard.

Gallery:

Atari 820 Printer

December 4th, 2017 No comments
Atari 820 Printer

The Atari 820 printer provided Atari 400/800 users with a quick and simple printer. No drivers or special interfaces were needed.

The Atari 820 printer plugged directly onto the Atari SIO bus and allowed users the ability to make 40 column printouts which were good for tracking finances, printing out program listings and other files. The printer made an interesting sound which could only be described as a washing machine.

Gallery:

source: atarimuseum.com

Soft Carry Cover for Atari 1050 Disk Drive

October 8th, 2017 No comments
Soft Carry Cover for Atari 1050 Disk Drive

Soft Carry Cover for Atari 1050 Disk Drive.

Gallery:

Atari 2600 Dark Vader Defender Pack (Boxed)

October 8th, 2017 No comments
Atari 2600 Dark Vader Defender Pack (Boxed)

The Atari 2600 (or Atari Video Computer System before November 1982) is a home video game console by Atari, Inc. Released on September 11, 1977, it is credited with popularizing the use of microprocessor-based hardware and ROM cartridges containing game code, a format first used with the Fairchild Channel F video game console in 1976. This format contrasts with the older model of having non-microprocessor dedicated hardware, which could only play the games that were physically built into the unit.

For five years, 1977 until late 1982, the system was officially sold as the Atari VCS, an abbreviation for Video Computer System. Following the release of the Atari 5200 in November 1982, the VCS was renamed to the “Atari 2600″, after the unit’s Atari part number, CX2600. The 2600 was typically bundled with two joystick controllers, a conjoined pair of paddle controllers, and a game cartridge: initially Combat, and later Pac-Man.

Gallery:

source: wikipedia

Atari Paddle Controllers CX 30-04 Retail Box

October 8th, 2017 No comments
Atari Paddle Controllers CX 30-04 Retail Box

A paddle is a game controller with a round wheel and one or more fire buttons, where the wheel is typically used to control movement of the player object along one axis of the video screen.

A paddle controller rotates through a fixed arc (usually about 330 degrees); it has a stop at each end.

Atari Joystick CX-40-04 Retail Box

October 8th, 2017 No comments
Atari Joystick CX-40-04 Retail Box

The Atari CX40 joystick was the first widely used cross-platform game controller. The original CX10 appeared on the Atari 2600 in 1977, and was considered such a great advance over other controllers that it became the primary input device for most games on the platform. The CX10 was replaced after a year by the much simpler and less expensive CX40. The addition of the Atari joystick port to other platforms cemented its popularity, and millions were produced and used on almost every game console and home computer of the era.

The CX40 was so popular during its run that it became as iconic for Atari as its “Fuji” it remains a common staple in video game iconography to this day, and is commonly referred to as the symbol of 1980s video game system design. The CX40 has been called “the pinnacle of home entertainment controllers in its day”, and remains a staple of industrial design discussions.

source: wikipedia

Atari Multi System Deluxe Joystick Controller CX24 (Boxed)

October 8th, 2017 2 comments
Atari Multi System Deluxe Joystick Controller CX24 (Boxed)

Of all of the Joysticks Atari ever made over the years they were in business, our two least favorite Atari controllers were the 7800 CX24 Slim line Deluxe Joystick (sometimes called the Atari Proline Joystick) and the ill fated Atari Space Age Joystick, which had an internal flex circuit problem from the start and caused it to be dropped by Atari very fast.  Now Atari Space Age Joysticks are a very rare Atari collector item.

The main reason why the Atari CX24 dual fire button Joystick was not one of our favorite Atari controllers made, was the left, right fire button PCB’s and Main X / Y PCB would fail very fast. 1st the left and right fire buttons PCBs would fail and second the main X / Y PCB would fail next with any kind of normal use.  

You can read more about this joystick here

Atari Trak-Ball CX-80 (Boxed)

October 8th, 2017 No comments
Atari Trak-Ball CX-80 (Boxed)

The Atari Trak-Ball is a pointing/movement device consisting of a ball held by a socket containing sensors to detect a rotation of the ball about two axis-like an upside-down mouse with an exposed protruding ball. The user rolls the ball with the palm of the hand while using the fingertips to press the two large buttons.

The Atari Track-Ball is mainly used with games like Centipede, Missile Command, Crystal Castle, etc.

Gallery:

Atari Program Recorder Model XC11 (Boxed)

October 7th, 2017 No comments
Atari Program Recorder Model XC11 (Boxed)

The Atari Tape Recorder Model XC11 can save or load programs/data from magnetic media (audio cassette).

The transfer rate is 600bits per second, so you can record about 100,000 bytes of data on a regular 60 minute cassette.

Unlike the new XC12 model in the XC11 we find the SIO pass through connector so this device can be connected anywhere in the SIO chain.

The power is supplied from the I/O Serial cable (SIO).

Gallery:

Atari Program Recorder Model 410 Boxed (early model)

October 7th, 2017 No comments
Atari Program Recorder Model 410 Boxed (early model)

I did not find much information about this specific Atari Tape Recorder Model 410, probably is one of the first models that have been produced for the Atari 400/800 series and does not have the SIO passtrough to connect other external peripherals.

General informations:

The Program Recorder was well built and study with built in power supply and SIO cable, the 410 didn’t need a bukly external power pak like most other Atari 400/800 components, how the SIO cable being built in and the Program Recorder having no daisy chain port on the unit meant that it had to be placed at the end of the SIO chain.

The original idea of the SIO (Serial I/O) port on the Atari computers was that it was to be used only for the Data cassette drive, however its functionality was extended so that it could use all Atari peripherals including disk drives, printers and modem.

The Atari 410/410a had a unique feature exclusively used by Atari. They could play two seperate tracks on a tape, this proved very useful for interactive programs where a user would run a program and would hear audio music/speech while the other track would load the next part of the program.

Gallery:

source: atarimuseum.com

Some interesting things to close my personal Atari collection

October 7th, 2017 No comments
Some interesting things to close my personal Atari collection

Some interesting things to close my personal Atari collection.

Description:

  • Atari Program Recorder Model 410 (early model)
  • Atari Program Recorder Model XC11.
  • Atari 2600 Dark Vader Defender Pack.
  • Atari Joystick CX-40-04 Retail Box.
  • Atari Paddle Controllers CX 30-04 Retail Box.
  • Atari Multi System Deluxe Joystick Controller CX24.
  • Atari Centipede (Atari)
  • Atari Trak-Ball CX-80.
  • Music Construction Set (Electronic Arts)
  • Atari 1050 Disk Drive Soft Cover.

Atari The Educator / Atari 1025 Printer / Atari 1030 Modem (all Boxed)

May 30th, 2015 No comments

Atari The Educator

Atari The Educator (Boxed)

The package includes:

  • Basic Cartridge.
  • Software & State Capital software on tape.
  • The Program Recorder Atari 410.

Download: Atari Educator Owners Guide (731)

Atari 1025 80-Column Printer

Atari 1025 Printer (Boxed)

Printer Specifications:

  • 40 cps (80-column 10 cpi mode)
  • 5 cpi expanded (40 col), 10 cpi (80 col), 16.7 cpi condensed (132-col)
  • 5×7 character dot matrix.
  • Buffer: 132 chrs at 16.7 cpi, 80 chrs at 10 cpi.
  • Paper: roll,fanfold,single sheets. optional:roll paper holder, tractor feed.

Atari 1030 Modem

Atari 1030 Modem (Boxed)

With the introduction of Atari all new XL line of computers came the all new Atari 1030 direct connect modem. The modem had a very unique feature packed into it. Just like the Atari 850 interface, the Atari 1030 modem had not only its device driver in ROM which would automatically upload into the computers memory, but also its software as well.

The Atari 1030 came with an on-board software package called ModemLink which would automatically upload into the computers memory. However there was a catch, like all previous Atari software, ModemLink had no provisions for Uploading or Downloading software, also in order to use the on-board ModemLink software any disk drives that were connected to your system had to be turned OFF.

Later Atari 1030′s were packaged with “The New Atari 1030 Software Package” which was a diskette with Amodem, Tscope and DiskLink software. Amodem was written by Jim Steinbrecher of Atari telecom fame, Tscope was written by Joe Miller and was for use with Compuserve.

Gallery:

source: atarimuseum.com

Atari 400 PAL / Communicator I & II / Bookkeeper / Programmer …

March 4th, 2015 No comments
Atari 400 PAL

The Atari 8-bit family is a series of 8-bit home computers introduced by Atari, Inc. in 1979 and manufactured until 1992. All are based on the MOS Technology 6502 CPU running at 1.79 MHz, roughly twice that of similar designs, and were the first home computers designed with custom co-processor chips. This architecture allowed the Atari designs to offer graphics and sound capabilities that were more advanced than contemporary machines like the Apple II or Commodore PET, and gaming on the platform was a major draw – Star Raiders is widely considered the platform’s killer app. Machines with similar performance would not appear until the BBC Micro in late 1981 and the Commodore 64 in 1982.

The original Atari 400 and 800 models were released with a series of plug-n-play peripherals that used Atari’s unique “SIO” serial bus system. Over the following decade several versions of the same basic design were released, including the XL and XE series of computers and matching peripherals. All of these used the same basic logical design, with various changes to the physical layout to lower production costs as chipmaking and manufacturing processes improved over time. The early machines were expensive to build, but dependable. Later models like the XEs were greatly cost-reduced and generally not as robust. Sub-models of these later designs were sold into the eastern European market after sales of the main lineup had ended.

Overall, the Atari 8-bit computer line was a commercial success, selling two million units during its major production run between late 1979 and mid-1985, putting its sales on par with machines like the Sinclair ZX Spectrum and TI-99/4A. Its primary competition in the worldwide market was the Commodore 64, by far the best selling computer of the 8-bit era. Atari also found a strong market in Eastern Europe and had something of a renaissance in the early 1990s as these countries joined a uniting Europe. Some estimates place sales during this period at another two million units.

Atari 400 inside the package:

Atari 400 PAL

Package Contents:

  • Atari 400 Home Computer.
  • Manuals.
  • External Power Supply.
  • 48k Ram Expansion Kit (this one was added by me and not included in the original packaging)

Atari 825 – 80 Column printer:

Atari 825 - 80 Column Printer

Atari introduced with its Atari 400 and 800 series computers its first 80 Column printer.   The Atari 825 which actually a repackaged Centronics 737 printer.   Earlier models had limited capabilities, the later 825 models with the extended basic character set had the capability of producing the Atari ATASCII graphics character set.  The Atari 825 required the use of the Atari 850 interface module to allow it to communicate with the Atari 400 and 800 computer because it had a Centronic parallel interface on it instead of the Atari SIO interface which the Atari 820 and Atari 822 printers had built in.

The B Key 400:

The B Key 400

The B Key 400 is a replacement keyboard for the keyboard membrane of the Atari 400.

Read more…

Atari 800XL Upgrade: VBXe / Simple Stereo + U-Switch / Side 2

February 4th, 2015 No comments
Zoe is trying to play at Donkey Kong

Atari 800XL Upgrading.

Installation and preparing:

  • VBXE v2.1 Interface Installation.
  • Simple Stereo + U-Switch Installation.
  • Formatting and partitioning CF Card (Sandisk ULTRA 2Gb) for the SIDE 2 Cartridge/SDX.

Software update:

  • Update the Ultimate 1MB (First batch 2011) Flash AM29040BL.
  • Update Ultimate 1MB (First batch 2011) Xilinx XC95144XL JTAG Firmware (v1 to v2)

Upgrade/Fix:

  • Fixed some wrong connections of the old installation from the Ultimate 1MB to the Atari 800XL PCB.
  • Removed the RF Modulator and installation of a Female DIN (8 pin + GND) for the RGB output + RGB CTRL + SYNC + AUDIO (Stereo)
  • I have also made a cable from a male DIN (8 pin) to Scart, fully shielded of a four meters lengths.

All these interfaces can be purchased on the lotharek website.

Some photos of the installation:

Atari 800 Boxed (UK-PAL) – Atari 810 Boxed – Atari 410 Boxed

December 26th, 2014 No comments
Atari 800 (UK-PAL)

The Atari 8-bit family is a series of 8-bit home computers introduced by Atari, Inc. in 1979 and manufactured until 1992. All are based on the MOS Technology 6502 CPU running at 1.79 MHz, roughly twice that of similar designs, and were the first home computers designed with custom co-processor chips. This architecture allowed the Atari designs to offer graphics and sound capabilities that were more advanced than contemporary machines like the Apple II or Commodore PET, and gaming on the platform was a major draw – Star Raiders is widely considered the platform’s killer app. Machines with similar performance would not appear until the BBC Micro in late 1981 and the Commodore 64 in 1982.

The original Atari 400 and 800 models were released with a series of plug-n-play peripherals that used Atari’s unique “SIO” serial bus system. Over the following decade several versions of the same basic design were released, including the XL and XE series of computers and matching peripherals. All of these used the same basic logical design, with various changes to the physical layout to lower production costs as chipmaking and manufacturing processes improved over time. The early machines were expensive to build, but dependable. Later models like the XEs were greatly cost-reduced and generally not as robust. Sub-models of these later designs were sold into the eastern European market after sales of the main lineup had ended.

Overall, the Atari 8-bit computer line was a commercial success, selling two million units during its major production run between late 1979 and mid-1985, putting its sales on par with machines like the Sinclair ZX Spectrum and TI-99/4A. Its primary competition in the worldwide market was the Commodore 64, by far the best selling computer of the 8-bit era. Atari also found a strong market in Eastern Europe and had something of a renaissance in the early 1990s as these countries joined a uniting Europe. Some estimates place sales during this period at another two million units.

The early machines: 400 and 800

Atari 800 (UK-PAL) Boxed

Management identified two sweet spots for the new computers: a low-end version known as Candy, and a higher-end machine known as Colleen (named after two attractive Atari secretaries). The primary difference between the two models was marketing;

Atari 800 (UK-PAL)

Atari marketed Colleen as a computer, and Candy as a game machine or hybrid game console. Colleen would include user-accessible expansion slots for RAM and ROM, two 8 KB cartridge slots, RF and monitor output (including two pins for separate luma and chroma) and a full keyboard, while Candy used a plastic “membrane keyboard”, non-accessible internal slots for memory, and only RF output for video.

Atari 810 Boxed

The Atari 810 Disk Drive was Atari’s first disk drive for its line of Atari 400/800 computers. Providing 88K of storage per disk side, the 810 gave Atari computer users the ability to quickly store and retrieve documents and program files to and from the storage device. Up to 4 Atari 810′s could be daisy chained together via the Atari SIO bus for a total of almost 360K of on-line random access file storage and retrieval.

The Atari 810 came in two different versions; the Tandon mech version and the MPI mech version. The Atari 810 is rather large compared to other companies disk drives and has an external 9Vac power supply. The reason why the drive is so large is that there is no disk drive controller in any of the Atari 400/800 computers, instead each device that connects to an Atari computer through its SIO bus is actually an intelligent device with its own intelligent communications controller and floppy disk controller.

The case design was conceived by Kevin McKinsey of Atari’s Home Computer Industrial Design group. The case is interesting in that the top and bottom covers are actually the same part made to assemble the top and bottom sides. Adhesive labels on the back of the 810 would block unused ports on the topside of the cover.

Atari 410 Boxed

The Atari 410 came in 2 different versions, the above shown is the Atari 410a Tawain version. The Program Recorder was well built and strudy with built in power supply and SIO cable, the 410 didn’t need a bukly external power pak like most other Atari 400/800 components, how the SIO cable being built in and the Program Recorder having no daisy chain port on the unit meant that it had to be placed at the end of the SIO chain.

The original idea of the SIO (Serial I/O) port on the Atari computers was that it was to be used only for the Data cassette drive, however its functionality was extended so that it could use all Atari peripherals including disk drives, printers and modem. The Atari 410/410a had a unique feature exclusively used by Atari. They could play two seperate tracks on a tape, this proved very useful for interactive programs where a user would run a program and would hear audio music/speech while the other track would load the next part of the program.

Below a collection of a high-quality photos

source: wikipedia atarimuseum.com